The downside? They’re expensive. Like, really expensive, depending on which one you get. Whether you really need one depends on your budget and how you’re going to be using your ball. For example, I use official match balls for practicing freekicks because they fly through the air really nicely. However, I don’t use them for training because if I lose my ball I’ll be set back $100-$300.
The ultimate determination is how a soccer ball feels and performs for you on contact. A good soccer ball will not only be tough enough to hold up to your fast and furious play, it will feature a soft casing for comfortable heading, and durable stitching (if stitched). It should handle well, and have good response. Most good soccer game balls feature a poly-urethane (PU) casing. Most leagues prefer 32-panel designs for its performance value. Also check for a warranty. Your new soccer ball should come with a manufacturer's warranty against defects and damage caused by normal play.

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This soccer ball is specifically designed for entry level youth players so that your young boy or girl will have no problem controlling this ball. In contrast to several of the soccer balls for kids on our list, this ball does not come inflated making for a learning experience for your young one. Kids can learn all about the mechanics of properly inflating a soccer ball before they began to play with it. The vibrant color of this ball paired with a dark asymmetrical pattern on the foreground presents a wonderful visual sensory stimulation experience for your young kid.
Adidas started to make soccer balls in 1963 but made the first official FIFA World Cup ball in 1970. This is the first ball used in the World Cup to use the Buckminster type of design. Also, the first ball with 32 black and white panels. The TELSTAR was more visible on black and white televisions (1970 FIFA World Cup Mexico™ was the first to be broadcast live on television). 
This Wilson Traditional Soccer Ball has a classic black and white design that kids are familiar with. For that fact, kids will have no problem becoming acquainted with this fun soccer ball with it’s non-distracting design. This is a very tough soccer ball with machine sewn stitching to ensure that the panels stay in place and the stitching will not fray as your kid kicks it up and down the soccer field or in the backyard. This Wilson Soccer Ball is so tough that even your family pet and kid may play together without the ball getting ruined. With it’s synthetic leather exterior, this Traditional Soccer Ball by Wilson is not only eco friendly, but easy to clean, too. The soft synthetic leather makes it very easy to write your kid's name onto the ball so that it will not get mixed up with the other kids they may play with in view of the fact that soccer balls promote social play.
A: The type of equipment that your child may need to play soccer in addition to a properly sized soccer ball will vary by organization. However, items such as shin guards, cleats and mouthpieces would be very practical for protective reasons. Soccer can be a vigorous sport, but with our helpful ball recommendations and proper sporting gear, your kid can have a safe playing experience.
Although the length of kick may end up being a little shorter, the changes make the Telstar 18 more balanced, says Alam. On other balls, Alam and his team have found that there is a difference in how the ball flies based on where it’s kicked in relation to the seams. His tests have found that the Telstar 18 ball doesn’t have as much variation. The total length of seam of the Telstar 18 is 14.1 feet, 3.28 feet more than on the Brazuca. With the longer seam, and more symmetric panels, no matter how the ball is turned there is the same amount of seam exposed. “The other two balls were not like that, they were significantly different,” he says.
This year, the ball shouldn’t have that kind of impact on which team wins the World Cup. In wind tunnel tests, Goff found that Telstar 18 has a very similar aerodynamic profile to the 2014 Brazuca ball, which flew without the wobbles of the Jabulani. The Jabulani was the first ball to have six seams and despite having a roughened surface, it was too smooth, says Goff. When the Brazuca was released, it had 68 percent more seams than the Jabulani to help change the airflow around the ball. The Telstar 18 is even more improved. Instead of transitioning to laminar flow in the middle of free kicks, Goff found that the Telstar 18 goes through its drag crisis at a lower speed of 38 miles an hour.
For the most part, soccer balls are pretty affordable. Training soccer balls for kids start at under $10, and for around $60 or less, you can get a good, league-approved tournament soccer ball. Of course there are more expensive ones, depending on what you're looking for. Cost depends on the type of ball, materials, quality, and also the outlet you buy from. Our soccer balls can be bought economically in sets of six or more, or singly. Shopping online at Epic Sports can save you up to 60 percent if not more off retail prices on your favorite brands.
Built for durability, recreation balls are made of soft synthetic materials for play on nearly any field. Typically, these balls are slightly heavier for beginner’s slower play, yet, competitors of all skill levels use these balls for practice and recreation on hard turf fields due to their resilience. Machine-stitching is the most stand-out visual difference between match balls and training balls and it offers a consistent touch for any player.
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