The best soccer ball for your child will depend on league requirements, since different age groups and leagues require different kinds of soccer balls. There are lots of great soccer balls for kids. Talk to their coach. Soccer balls for kids don't have to be expensive. Once you know your child's correct size, select one they like. If it feels right to them and they fall in love with it, they'll spend hours kicking it around and boning up on their skills. Make sure their soccer ball is lightweight and easy for them to control. For any kid new to soccer, that first goal will be a real self-confidence booster! Remember to keep training fun. We offer many colorful, affordable, fun-print soccer balls to liven up their practices.
If you're headed to the park to play a quick pickup game, brightly colored adidas soccer balls can help make it easy to distinguish your match from other games that might be being played nearby. Dribbling skills conducted with mini Nike soccer balls can hone your control skills, so you can glide past defenders with ease. Look for 12-panel soccer balls that provide a true, accurate flight with each strike, and rubber butyl bladders that offer excellent shape and air retention, so you can quickly jump into a game without looking for a pump. If you prefer playing indoors, check out a futsal ball that's slightly smaller than regulation soccer balls and is designed for use on hard indoor courts.
We sell other soccer gear and equipment as well, including several outdoor and indoor portable soccer goals and indoor soccer equipment for those hardcore players. And what better way to carry around your ball and pair of adidas F50 shoes than with one of our soccer bags. Browse our full line of soccer gear from the best brand names in the game. Don’t forget to sign up for our free Garage Club to save big on the year’s best gear.
The secret to the authentic movements on a rebound with this ball is the inclusion of an SBR foam layer underneath the PU cover. This allows the power of a pass or shot to be transferred with more accuracy. It keeps the ball somewhat soft to the touch, but creates a realistic movement which allows players to develop an ability to start reading the game with accuracy without the need to purchase an expensive premium match soccer ball. It comes in all of the standard sizes and offers 4 unique design options, allowing players of any age or ability to begin working on their soccer skills.
Over time, many soccer balls tend to go out-of-round, especially if they are well-used. The Glider is designed to maintain its shape without losing air thanks to the firmness and consistency of the butyl bladder. Under regular use, we found that the air pressure was consistent enough that we didn’t need to add more air to the ball. If you play in organized soccer, then having consistency from the practice ball to the game ball is very important for skill development. The machine-stitched panels offer that experience for most players, even though the ball has the standard panel design.
This year, the ball shouldn’t have that kind of impact on which team wins the World Cup. In wind tunnel tests, Goff found that Telstar 18 has a very similar aerodynamic profile to the 2014 Brazuca ball, which flew without the wobbles of the Jabulani. The Jabulani was the first ball to have six seams and despite having a roughened surface, it was too smooth, says Goff. When the Brazuca was released, it had 68 percent more seams than the Jabulani to help change the airflow around the ball. The Telstar 18 is even more improved. Instead of transitioning to laminar flow in the middle of free kicks, Goff found that the Telstar 18 goes through its drag crisis at a lower speed of 38 miles an hour.
When any object goes through the air, a thin cushion of air wraps around it that stays relatively still. This boundary layer is why you get dust trapped on your ceiling fan. At slower speeds, the air around a soccer ball moves smoothly over the surface and separates off the sides of the ball at its widest points. Imagine a ball moving from right to left across a clock, Goff explains, so traveling from the 3 to the 9. With laminar flow, the air flows over the surface and then flows off at the 12 and 6, which creates more drag in the air. Drag slows the ball down faster. At higher speeds, the air moves turbulently across the ball’s surface and peels off at the 2 and 4. The wind effectively wraps around the back. This turbulent flow has less drag, which means the ball keeps moving at high speed for longer.
With the exception of the Wilson Traditional soccer ball, each of the soccer balls above is unique. Not only by the bold colors and detailed designs but the machine stitching technology that has sewn the panels together. Kids can benefit greatly from having a soccer ball that stands out because it will encourage them to learn more about soccer so that they can really use their cool, unique soccer ball. A unique ball will also distinguish their ball from many others at soccer practices and camps.
With the increased seam length, Goff says there was actually a risk that this ball would be too rough. “Very little changes in those textures can have noticeable aerodynamic effects,” he says. The fact that the Telstar 18 has almost the same drag curve as the Brazuca, with aerodynamic properties changing at about the same speeds, is impressive. “It has to be an engineering and technical challenge,” he says.

For those taking their game to the next level, it’s important to train with a ball similar to what is used for your matches. Your passing, shooting and general foot skills will be different for lighter soccer balls made with a premium bladder like latex. Try out an NFHS approved ball which is used for some club, high school, and college teams. To be NFHS approved, the soccer ball needs to:

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