This soccer ball by American Challenge comes in three different vibrant colors, lemon yellow, lime green and orange. This is a great soccer ball for your young kid as the outer covering is made from high grade thermoplastic polyurethane. Even more sustainable, the backing material is made up of two layers of poly and cotton lining. The inside of this American Challenge Soccer Ball, also known as the bladder, is composed of Hybrid SR and retains air for up to two to four weeks. This is amazing, as your young kid is sure to play with this colorful ball often.
Before your little one can think about joining a pee-wee soccer team, they first need to master some basic motor skills...like running and kicking! For a new walker, the concept of pulling their leg back to kick forward is not only foreign but may result with them landing on their little tush on the ground more often than not. The Daball Toddler Soft soccer ball provides your child with a fun incentive to practice these important gross-motor skill-building exercises. Did we mention the cute animal faces? Available in zebra, giraffe, owl, fox, and polar bear styles, these balls are sure to bring delight to any playing time! Despite their cutesy appearance, this ball is built to last, featuring a TPU material exterior, the same type of cover used by junior and professional soccer leagues. This extra-durable substance known as Thermoplastic Polyurethane, or TPU, is a rubber-like plastic that is extremely flexible and smooth to the touch but can also resist scratching and will keep your ball looking newer, longer. 

Latex bladders are used in high-quality balls. These kind of bladders are soft and provide good feeling. They offer better response and bounce than Butyl bladders, but the downside of this kind of bladder is they don’t hold the air for too long. As a result, they require filling more frequently. Air escapes due to micropores on the cover, but nowadays some balls are constructed with carbon latex bladder to help to close these micropores. As a result, the balls can hold air for a longer period.

In 1937, the regulation soccer ball put on a little weight, increasing from 13-15 ounces to 14-16 ounces. Soccer balls used to be made exclusively of leather. Not so these days! Current technologies have come up with leather-like synthetic materials that are softer, more lightweight, water-proof, and perform as well if not better than leather soccer balls. As for the look, early soccer balls were tan but difficult to see from the stands; although white leather-washed soccer balls are known to have been used. White soccer balls replaced their tan predecessors in the 1950s, and were composed of 18 panels. Black spots were added to allow soccer players to track the ball's swerve. Today's soccer balls come in an array of colorful designs and styles to suit every player.
Adidas says its design was motivated by Russia's urban landscapes. It uses textured graphics and a metallic sheen to bring a modern look to the classic design. The ball is made of six panels of thermally bonded TPU and about 15% silicone. The materials allow for better trajectory, accuracy, responsiveness, and low water absorption. It also feels well-padded and slightly lighter than previous match balls.

On the other hand, replicas (sometimes called training balls or gliders) are designed to be just like the official match balls but are much cheaper. Their panels are often stitched rather than thermally-bonded and are made of a different material. However, they’re not necessarily less durable than official match balls. So, they’re the recommended option for most players. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2Xn84L3Kcs
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