In 2010, the infamous Jabulani balls for the World Cup in South Africa transitioned from turbulent to laminar flow between 50 and 45 miles per hour, right at the speed for corner and free kicks. The transition between these different types of flow causes even more drag on the ball, which caused the Jabulani to wobble in the air and drop in ways that players weren’t expecting.
Overall nice soccer ball for a toddler. The colors are bright and the ball is pretty soft. It came in a small box and was easy to blow up. The air pump came with it as well. I blew up the ball as soon as I got it and let the ball sit for a couple of days then filled it again once or twice and I think that helped the ball get back to its round shape as over reviews mentioned theirs being slightly off shape.

On the other hand, replicas (sometimes called training balls or gliders) are designed to be just like the official match balls but are much cheaper. Their panels are often stitched rather than thermally-bonded and are made of a different material. However, they’re not necessarily less durable than official match balls. So, they’re the recommended option for most players. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2Xn84L3Kcs
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