It is also a good idea to clean your soccer ball after you have finished using it. Although regularly cleaning a soccer ball can be a time-consuming chore, it will extend the life of the ball’s cover. The grit, dirt, and debris that the ball can pick up on any pitch impacts the panels and stitching with every rotation. So clean it thoroughly and then allow it to dry for the best possible results.


Controlling the game is everything. From touch, shape, and movement, to flight of the ball, the construction of your soccer ball can impact how well you command the pitch. Competitive soccer players usually have different types of soccer balls for training, match day or just to kick around. See the options below for choosing the right adidas soccer ball for your favorite type of play.
This Wilson Traditional Soccer Ball has a classic black and white design that kids are familiar with. For that fact, kids will have no problem becoming acquainted with this fun soccer ball with it’s non-distracting design. This is a very tough soccer ball with machine sewn stitching to ensure that the panels stay in place and the stitching will not fray as your kid kicks it up and down the soccer field or in the backyard. This Wilson Soccer Ball is so tough that even your family pet and kid may play together without the ball getting ruined. With it’s synthetic leather exterior, this Traditional Soccer Ball by Wilson is not only eco friendly, but easy to clean, too. The soft synthetic leather makes it very easy to write your kid's name onto the ball so that it will not get mixed up with the other kids they may play with in view of the fact that soccer balls promote social play.
Every four years there’s a new ball for the World Cup—and every four years players are unhappy with it. Maybe it’s too light and has too much lift, like the 2002 Fevernova. Or maybe it wobbles unexpectedly in the air, making it harder for goalies to predict its motion, like the 2006 Teamgist. Or maybe the ball suddenly changes speed, dropping out of the air and causing accidental handballs, like the 2010 Jabulani.
Adidas started to make soccer balls in 1963 but made the first official FIFA World Cup ball in 1970. This is the first ball used in the World Cup to use the Buckminster type of design. Also, the first ball with 32 black and white panels. The TELSTAR was more visible on black and white televisions (1970 FIFA World Cup Mexico™ was the first to be broadcast live on television). 

On the other hand, replicas (sometimes called training balls or gliders) are designed to be just like the official match balls but are much cheaper. Their panels are often stitched rather than thermally-bonded and are made of a different material. However, they’re not necessarily less durable than official match balls. So, they’re the recommended option for most players. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2Xn84L3Kcs
×