We have gathered a list of soccer balls that all fall within the mini to youth categories from across the web. These balls are the perfect size for your little one, whether they are just learning how to kick or about to start their first year on their middle school soccer team. We hope that one of our Top 10 Best Soccer Balls for Kids will be the right size…and style for your child.
In terms of durability, you can’t really go past Select. The polyurethane cover on the Numero 10 is tough enough to withstand dog bites and general wear and tear, but still feels nice and soft when kicked. Although this ball is a bit more expensive than other replicas, it comes with a two-year warranty for peace of mind when buying. It also retains its bounce very well over the years – perfect for practicing volleys and clearances.
If you have a youth player for whom you are purchasing this soccer ball, then take note that the Size 3 ball in this series is closer to a Size 4 ball. The weight and feel is still accurate, so it is good for home practice and play. The sizing just might make it difficult to take this ball to practice for some players. It doesn’t come with a 32-panel design, but it does have the traditional hexagon panels over the entire cover of the ball. This allows players to work on some ball movement skills, as well as placement drills, with relative ease at home.
Now you know that there are total 5 variations in ball size. Buy the appropriate size as per your requirement. Some buyers who don’t know these differences, make a mistake while buying. For example, if someone is looking for an official match ball, but they purchase a size 3 ball by mistake or because of lack of knowledge. If you also do this, surely you are not going to be satisfied with the purchase.
All in all a street soccer ball needs to be rough and tough with all the attributes we discussed so far. Senda street soccer ball has fulfilled all these requirements, and met our expectation. We recommend you to buy this option if you want to play on street or hard surface. We found this as a good quality model with the proper construction as we discussed. The weight and bounce are also according to the requirement of a street soccer ball.
If you've ever noticed, a traditional soccer ball resembles a geodesic dome building. Such as the one designed by architect, Richard Buckminster Fuller. Thus the ball became called the Buckminster Ball. Or more simply, the "Buckeyball". The design is characterized by a pattern of twenty hexagon pieces, and twelve pentagon pieces, fitted together to create a perfect sphere. The soccer ball has undergone many design changes of various-shaped panels stitched together. But until the geodesic dome-like ball, it was never quite round enough to perform right. Manufacturers settled upon the modern thirty-two panel design, which enables the ball to roll and spin more evenly and smoothly. Which is probably why it's the most popular competition soccer ball on the market today. The Buckminister-style soccer ball was first sold in the 1950s, and debuted in the 1970 World Cup tournament.

Match balls are constructed specifically for competition and the sport's high-level training. These balls feature higher quality materials and must conform to regulation standards of your league. Training and recreational soccer balls are designed to handle extended use on a variety of playing surfaces, often featuring a PVA casing for enhanced durability.
On the other hand, replicas (sometimes called training balls or gliders) are designed to be just like the official match balls but are much cheaper. Their panels are often stitched rather than thermally-bonded and are made of a different material. However, they’re not necessarily less durable than official match balls. So, they’re the recommended option for most players. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2Xn84L3Kcs
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