Soccer, also known as "the beautiful game," is an excellent sport to increase physical fitness and the concept of teamwork. Get your little superstar started with one of our top 10 soccer balls varying in sizes and age ranges. Our list was recently updated to include new products as well as updated product specifications like construction materials, size, cost and availability.
Now you know that there are total 5 variations in ball size. Buy the appropriate size as per your requirement. Some buyers who don’t know these differences, make a mistake while buying. For example, if someone is looking for an official match ball, but they purchase a size 3 ball by mistake or because of lack of knowledge. If you also do this, surely you are not going to be satisfied with the purchase.
Soccer is also one of the most simplistic games that you can play. A field, a couple of nets, and rulebook can be highly beneficial and desirable, especially for team play. Really all you need, however, is a ball and enough open space to kick it. The modern soccer ball was created more recently in 1855 by a man named Charles Goodyear who created the very first vulcanized rubber balls. Today there are many types and styles of soccer balls available on the market to suit a variety of skill levels and needs.
It depends on its intended use. Soccer ball casings are made from three kinds of synthetic materials. Polyvinyl carbonate (PVC) which is what most less expensive training balls are made from, Polyurethane (PU) which is the preferred ball for soccer tournaments, and a combination of the two. There are also foam and rubber training soccer balls for kids. Some kids' soccer balls are made of 100 percent thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), which is a kind of foamy casing material so the ball is very soft. There are greater and lesser grades of each kind of material. PU-covered balls are generally softer, livelier, and have a better feel to them, and are what most people seek when looking for a optimal performing soccer ball.
When looking for the right ball for your child, you may come across a reference to different sizes of soccer balls. These sizes can vary a bit from product to product but most do conform to certain league standards. A size 1 ball is also known as a mini ball and is typically between 18 and 20 inches in circumference. This size is perfect for toddlers and early walkers to help them develop footwork skills and ball control. A size 3 ball, or a junior ball, is usually between 23 and 24 inches around. This is the type of ball that most peewee soccer teams use as it is designed for children 8 years and younger. As your child grows and continues with their soccer team, they will eventually need a size 4 ball which is 25 to 26 inches. This is known as a youth ball and is ideal for children between 8 and 12 years of age. Finally, the size 5 or adult ball is 27 to 28 inches in circumference. This is the size of the soccer ball used by professional athletes and is suitable for anyone age 13 years or older.
Many of today's soccer balls forgo the classic 32-panel design for 8-panel or 14-panel designs that exude a sleek, hyper-modern look (i.e., the2006 FIFA World Cup Teamgeist adidas soccer ball). Whether you prefer a traditional or contemporary style soccer ball, you'll find it here in the SoccerGarage.com Balls section. We carry professional level FIFA approved match soccer balls, futsal balls, training soccer balls and a variety of special surface and indoor soccer balls.
Comfort during the shot should be the number one factor to watch out when you are buying a beach soccer ball. Senda Playa offers you that comfort from its larger, and softer panels. So, you will find it very easy to shot the ball barefooted. The panels are scratch-resistant too that makes it suitable for playing on the rough sand beach. No doubt, like any other beach ball, this one also offers water-resistant cover too.
Wilson is a classic sports company that gives you just about everything that you need in a soccer ball. This ball has a synthetic leather cover which is soft to the kick, but also has enhanced ball durability. It has a butyl rubber bladder to hold the air which gives the ball its shape and and retains the air. This has the classic black and white panel colors.
Despite the similarities with the Brazuca, the few differences between this ball and what players have gotten used to over the last four years will have an impact on play, says Firoz Alam, an aerodynamics engineer at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Australia, who has also performed wind tunnel tests on the Telstar 18. “When the player is making a short pass, they have to push a little harder, because at less then 60 kilometers per hour [or 37 miles per hour]it has more flight resistance than the Brazuca,” says Alam. The mid-range passes and corner kicks that gave the Jabulani so much trouble have been resolved. Compared to the Brazuca, the Telstar 18 is also more aerodynamically efficient in the 40-50 mile an hour range, so Alam says players will actually have to kick a little softer or they’re likely to overshoot. Over 55 miles an hour the two balls will feel very similar.
For those taking their game to the next level, it’s important to train with a ball similar to what is used for your matches. Your passing, shooting and general foot skills will be different for lighter soccer balls made with a premium bladder like latex. Try out an NFHS approved ball which is used for some club, high school, and college teams. To be NFHS approved, the soccer ball needs to:
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