Take on your activities with high-quality adidas Soccer Balls from Academy Sports. This gear is designed to motivate and help you get the most out of your activities. When it comes to adidas Soccer Balls you never want to settle for anything less than the best. That's why we feature this top-tier brand that provides products you can trust and will want to show off. Quality materials combine with exceptional design to keep you feeling your best. Shop our incredible assortment now to find your new go-to's, or find the perfect birthday or holiday gift for a friend or family member. Any fan of this popular brand would love a gift from this great selection. After all, having the best gear is the best motivation to get up, get out, and get active. You can always count on Academy to have the best assortment of outdoor and indoor essentials that are reliable and ready for anything you are.

In 1937, the regulation soccer ball put on a little weight, increasing from 13-15 ounces to 14-16 ounces. Soccer balls used to be made exclusively of leather. Not so these days! Current technologies have come up with leather-like synthetic materials that are softer, more lightweight, water-proof, and perform as well if not better than leather soccer balls. As for the look, early soccer balls were tan but difficult to see from the stands; although white leather-washed soccer balls are known to have been used. White soccer balls replaced their tan predecessors in the 1950s, and were composed of 18 panels. Black spots were added to allow soccer players to track the ball's swerve. Today's soccer balls come in an array of colorful designs and styles to suit every player.
Due to the nature of these soccer balls, kids can surely enjoy playing with their peers as any ball in general, especially soccer balls encourage interactive play. With the soccer balls above, kids will be able to not only play soccer games on the field with their teammates but play at home and during recess, too. Social play is essential to the livelihood of kids in view of the fact that it teaches kids how to interact with society as they grow older. Social play even creates the opportunity for problem-solving skills, as well as imaginative and physical play.

This miniaturized soccer ball may seem very tiny, measuring just under 6 inches in diameter. While definitely not a legal size for any type of league play, this small ball is ideal for toddlers to start building their basic skills. Utilizing this ball, your child can practice kicking, grabbing, throwing, and grasping which can assist in the development of gross-motor skills. Playing with your child is also a great way to strengthen familial bonds and bolster your little one’s self-confidence.


Wilson is a classic sports company that gives you just about everything that you need in a soccer ball. This ball has a synthetic leather cover which is soft to the kick, but also has enhanced ball durability. It has a butyl rubber bladder to hold the air which gives the ball its shape and and retains the air. This has the classic black and white panel colors.
A: The type of equipment that your child may need to play soccer in addition to a properly sized soccer ball will vary by organization. However, items such as shin guards, cleats and mouthpieces would be very practical for protective reasons. Soccer can be a vigorous sport, but with our helpful ball recommendations and proper sporting gear, your kid can have a safe playing experience.
A radically new configuration reduced the amount of panel touch points forming a smooth and perfectly round exterior that improved accuracy and control. Prior to the Teamgeist, the surface of World Cup match balls had notable differences depending on where a player would strike the ball due to seams, ridges and other imperfections where panels come together. The revolutionary propeller design of the Teamgeist minimized corners and created a smoother surface for improved play. The ball was designed with traditional colors of the German flag and was accentuated with the golden color of the World Cup trophy. 
2010 Jabulani Adidas This ball has 8 panels. A special variant was used for the final match, the gold Jo'bulani (picture on the left), which was named after "Jo'burg", a standard South African nickname for Johannesburg, site of the final game. The ball was notable for the controversy it attracted, with players and fans contending that its aerodynamics were unusually unpredictable. [3][19]
The history of soccer balls date back to ancient times. From a couple centuries BC to about 200 AD, the Chinese used balls made from animal skins in a game called 'tsu chu', in which players had to pass them through a net stretched between two poles. The ancient Greeks, Romans, and even the Egyptians are recorded to have enjoyed a similar game that involved kicking a makeshift ball.
This is a felt cover ball, which is the major characteristics of an indoor soccer ball. Durable felt cover offers the softness and helps to control the rebounding characteristics. This is a size 5 ball with hand stitched panels. Hand stitched panels are more durable than machine stitched panels. The bounce is not too high, which should be the case of a standard indoor soccer ball.
I read a few bad reviews on here but I didn't think the ball will be that bad. I had this ball for just a week! It looked great in the box but it's a very low quality soccer ball. It got deflated after hitting the post. There were marks and slits left on it after everything it hit. Might be good for kids but if you play soccer on a high level, you're really wasting your money buying this.
Every four years there’s a new ball for the World Cup—and every four years players are unhappy with it. Maybe it’s too light and has too much lift, like the 2002 Fevernova. Or maybe it wobbles unexpectedly in the air, making it harder for goalies to predict its motion, like the 2006 Teamgist. Or maybe the ball suddenly changes speed, dropping out of the air and causing accidental handballs, like the 2010 Jabulani.

On the other hand, replicas (sometimes called training balls or gliders) are designed to be just like the official match balls but are much cheaper. Their panels are often stitched rather than thermally-bonded and are made of a different material. However, they’re not necessarily less durable than official match balls. So, they’re the recommended option for most players. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2Xn84L3Kcs
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