The soccer is the world's most popular and widely watched game. Due to increasing technological advancement and demand for performance, the ball manufacturers have been developing new designs progressively. A traditional spherical football made of 32 leather panels stitched together in 1970s has become only 14 synthetic curved panels thermally bonded without stitches ball in 2006 and more recently 8 panels football in 2010. Despite being most popular game in the world, scan data is available on aerodynamic properties of footballs especially Jabulani, Teamgeist and Fevernova balls. The primary objectives of this study were to evaluate aerodynamic performances of these three soccer balls. The aerodynamic forces and moments were measured experimentally for a range of wind speeds. The aerodynamic forces and their non-dimensional coefficients were determined and compared.
Another type of soccer ball that some players may find to be useful is the indoor soccer ball. Indoor balls are designed to have less bounce and rebound to them, making it possible to control the ball on a tighter court or field. The cover of an indoor ball is also the strongest of any category, so it can withstand play on turn, hard court surfaces, and impacts with walls.
If you've ever noticed, a traditional soccer ball resembles a geodesic dome building. Such as the one designed by architect, Richard Buckminster Fuller. Thus the ball became called the Buckminster Ball. Or more simply, the "Buckeyball". The design is characterized by a pattern of twenty hexagon pieces, and twelve pentagon pieces, fitted together to create a perfect sphere. The soccer ball has undergone many design changes of various-shaped panels stitched together. But until the geodesic dome-like ball, it was never quite round enough to perform right. Manufacturers settled upon the modern thirty-two panel design, which enables the ball to roll and spin more evenly and smoothly. Which is probably why it's the most popular competition soccer ball on the market today. The Buckminister-style soccer ball was first sold in the 1950s, and debuted in the 1970 World Cup tournament.
With the exception of the Wilson Traditional soccer ball, each of the soccer balls above is unique. Not only by the bold colors and detailed designs but the machine stitching technology that has sewn the panels together. Kids can benefit greatly from having a soccer ball that stands out because it will encourage them to learn more about soccer so that they can really use their cool, unique soccer ball. A unique ball will also distinguish their ball from many others at soccer practices and camps.
It is a common misconception but, believe it or not, soccer was not actually invented in England. Although the sport, known across the pond as football, was revolutionized by the country in the mid-19th century, records actually trace its origin back over 2,000 years to ancient China. Called “association football” when it was played by the British 200 years ago, the terms “football” and “soccer” were both eventually derived from abbreviations of the longer name over time.
The best soccer ball for your child will depend on league requirements, since different age groups and leagues require different kinds of soccer balls. There are lots of great soccer balls for kids. Talk to their coach. Soccer balls for kids don't have to be expensive. Once you know your child's correct size, select one they like. If it feels right to them and they fall in love with it, they'll spend hours kicking it around and boning up on their skills. Make sure their soccer ball is lightweight and easy for them to control. For any kid new to soccer, that first goal will be a real self-confidence booster! Remember to keep training fun. We offer many colorful, affordable, fun-print soccer balls to liven up their practices.

Select's attention to detail can be found in the ball's handy work and composition. It comes in nine different colors, including bright orange and bright yellow, which are perfect for training in semi-darkness. The 1.5mm PU cover is hand-stitched and textured for the brighter colors, adding durability. The design also aides turf play by zeroing in on control and resistance.
This Wilson Traditional Soccer Ball has a very traditional yet updated look, hence the name. The outside of this soccer ball is made of soft synthetic leather, making this ball feel quite smooth to the touch. The inside, also known as the bladder, of the ball is composed from Butyl rubber to provide an airtight compartment that is tough. In addition to that, Butyl rubber helps greatly with shape retention as your kid is sure to get many kicks out of this spectacular soccer ball by Wilson. Due to their reputable brand, you absolutely cannot go wrong with this traditional soccer ball by Wilson.

This size ball, the smallest aside from mini-balls not used for real practices or games, weighs 10 oz. and can be used for players under 8. The No. 3 ball is only 24 inches in circumference and thus doesn't come up as high on the leg as an adult model. You don't need to provide a match-quality ball for your young player, write the authors of "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Coaching Youth Soccer."
“Had I seen the drag curve for Jabulani prior to the 2010 World Cup in South Africa I would have been calling FIFA and Adidas saying please don’t use this ball,” Goff says. The fact that the Jabulani became unpredictable and beach-ball-like during these long passes really helped Spain win in 2010, Goff says. The Spanish team relied almost entirely on short precise passes, without long kicks that became unstable with the Jabulani ball. “That was the perfect example of a team that really fit the style of play for that ball,” Goff says.

Soccer is also one of the most simplistic games that you can play. A field, a couple of nets, and rulebook can be highly beneficial and desirable, especially for team play. Really all you need, however, is a ball and enough open space to kick it. The modern soccer ball was created more recently in 1855 by a man named Charles Goodyear who created the very first vulcanized rubber balls. Today there are many types and styles of soccer balls available on the market to suit a variety of skill levels and needs.
On the other hand, replicas (sometimes called training balls or gliders) are designed to be just like the official match balls but are much cheaper. Their panels are often stitched rather than thermally-bonded and are made of a different material. However, they’re not necessarily less durable than official match balls. So, they’re the recommended option for most players. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2Xn84L3Kcs
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