This was one of the few soccer balls that came our way that didn’t come inflated out of the box. How well the ball is inflated will depend on the long-term viability of the butyl bladder in this ball. When properly inflated with the correct needle, the air can be held for weeks, or even months, at a time. Compared to latex bladders, which need to be inflated about once per week on average, this Nike soccer ball offers a minimal maintenance experience. As a practice and play ball, the Nike Pitch Premier League Soccer Ball offers players a number of options that can help them improve their skills.
One of the top brands recommended by coaches, Adidas has a large line of fantastically designed soccer balls available in just the right size for your little one. The Ace Glider II is the perfect way to give your child a soccer ball that not only lasts but also shines on the field! The unique colorings of this ball make it visible from a long distance away, giving you a great way to spot your little one against others on the field. Not just a pretty face, the Glider II is also a sturdy and well-constructed soccer ball that utilizes top-quality materials for long-lasting play. The cover is made of durable TPU material that has been built to withstand daily practice and can handle both indoor and outdoor play. Unlike similar balls that tend to develop blisters over time, this ball uses heavy machine stitching that can significantly extend the life of the ball.
This Wilson Traditional Soccer Ball has a very traditional yet updated look, hence the name. The outside of this soccer ball is made of soft synthetic leather, making this ball feel quite smooth to the touch. The inside, also known as the bladder, of the ball is composed from Butyl rubber to provide an airtight compartment that is tough. In addition to that, Butyl rubber helps greatly with shape retention as your kid is sure to get many kicks out of this spectacular soccer ball by Wilson. Due to their reputable brand, you absolutely cannot go wrong with this traditional soccer ball by Wilson.
The most modern feature is an embedded NFC chip, which is found on the top of the ball. If you download a free app on iOS or Android, you can personally interact with the ball's exclusive content and location-specific challenges. You'll also be able to participate and enter competitions and World Cup-related challenges. Of course, you can record and upload your experiences for social media posterity.

The Wilson Soccer Ball comes in three different sizes as depending on your age group; you can purchase this product without any hindrance. It is machine-sewed with 32 different panels stretching all over its surface. The cover is made of synthetic leather which gives you a nice feel when you kick this ball. Furthermore, it is a durable product which is devoid of regular wear and tear.
The history of soccer balls date back to ancient times. From a couple centuries BC to about 200 AD, the Chinese used balls made from animal skins in a game called 'tsu chu', in which players had to pass them through a net stretched between two poles. The ancient Greeks, Romans, and even the Egyptians are recorded to have enjoyed a similar game that involved kicking a makeshift ball.
When any object goes through the air, a thin cushion of air wraps around it that stays relatively still. This boundary layer is why you get dust trapped on your ceiling fan. At slower speeds, the air around a soccer ball moves smoothly over the surface and separates off the sides of the ball at its widest points. Imagine a ball moving from right to left across a clock, Goff explains, so traveling from the 3 to the 9. With laminar flow, the air flows over the surface and then flows off at the 12 and 6, which creates more drag in the air. Drag slows the ball down faster. At higher speeds, the air moves turbulently across the ball’s surface and peels off at the 2 and 4. The wind effectively wraps around the back. This turbulent flow has less drag, which means the ball keeps moving at high speed for longer.
You should also try to keep the ball at the correct pressure. Do not over or under pressurize a soccer ball. Use the manufactures recommended air pressure that is printed on most balls. Most soccer balls have a pressure rating of 6 to 8 lbs. or 0.6 or 0.8 BAR. It is recommended that you use a pressure gauge to measure the exact amount of pressure in a ball after inflating and before use. It can also be a good idea to deflate the soccer training ball after use to reduce the pressure on the seams and stitching. Reflate the ball to the appropriate pressure before using it for a game or training.
Whatever ball you decide to purchase try to prolong the life of the ball by taking care of it. Don’t let your players stand on the ball or try to change the shape. Don’t leave them outside between practice sessions as prolonged exposure to sun or rain will damage the surface of the ball and dramatically reduce its life. Always try to keep balls clean after play by wiping them down with a damp cloth.
Ive just recieved the actual item and kind of disappointed at the moment. I have not taken pictures but I can if any1 wants to see it but that ball came with a bump. Right after a inflated it Ive noticed that it has noticeable bump and the spot is a bit curved. Guys im trying to buy a ball, why is it that hard to have it perfectly round , I mean come on ...
With the exception of the Wilson Traditional soccer ball, each of the soccer balls above is unique. Not only by the bold colors and detailed designs but the machine stitching technology that has sewn the panels together. Kids can benefit greatly from having a soccer ball that stands out because it will encourage them to learn more about soccer so that they can really use their cool, unique soccer ball. A unique ball will also distinguish their ball from many others at soccer practices and camps.

Bouncing a few ideas around on how to improve your game? You might just start with your soccer ball. As we know, the game of soccer involves a lot of fancy footwork, technique, and team work. But what it really comes down to is how well your soccer ball performs for you. Whether you're coaching, playing, or have a child in a soccer league, knowing a little more about the soccer ball, such as how to select one, how to tell a good soccer ball from a cheap one, and how to take care of it, can help you get the most out of yours. And that just might be all you need to kick your season off on the right foot this year.
Over time, many soccer balls tend to go out-of-round, especially if they are well-used. The Glider is designed to maintain its shape without losing air thanks to the firmness and consistency of the butyl bladder. Under regular use, we found that the air pressure was consistent enough that we didn’t need to add more air to the ball. If you play in organized soccer, then having consistency from the practice ball to the game ball is very important for skill development. The machine-stitched panels offer that experience for most players, even though the ball has the standard panel design.
The secret to the authentic movements on a rebound with this ball is the inclusion of an SBR foam layer underneath the PU cover. This allows the power of a pass or shot to be transferred with more accuracy. It keeps the ball somewhat soft to the touch, but creates a realistic movement which allows players to develop an ability to start reading the game with accuracy without the need to purchase an expensive premium match soccer ball. It comes in all of the standard sizes and offers 4 unique design options, allowing players of any age or ability to begin working on their soccer skills.

Crafted by Adidas, the Telstar 18 is the official ball of the FIFA World Cup. Drawing inspiration from the company's first World Cup match ball, which debuted at the 1970 tournament in Mexico, the new ball reimagines the 12 black panels on an otherwise white design. Fun fact: the iconic original black and white ball was made that way to be more visible for black-and-white TV viewers, and it was dubbed the "star of television."


To be honest, this ball’s a bit like a classic car, in that it’s awesome – when it works. The Jabulani is prone to valve issues, although they can be fixed. If you need something durable, we wouldn’t recommend this ball. However, if you’re looking to add an awesome ball to your collection – and you’ve got the cash – consider grabbing a Jabulani before they go extinct.
Enough learning on different aspects of soccer balls? Let’s have some fun then. We are going to give you our other specific reviews on different types of soccer balls so that you can choose the right option for you applying the knowledge you have just gathered. Obviously we suggest you to buy from the ones that we reviewed above. But you can consider the following ones as well.
Of everything that we have analyzed about these soccer balls, one of the biggest things that you can look at for is the external material of the ball. TPU seems like it is the standard in durability for soccer balls in this price range. Machine stitching is another thing that you want to make sure that you have, as it appears that some balls that are stitched otherwise can split open and leak. In any case, make sure that you have your own soccer pump so that you can always be sure that your soccer ball is properly inflated.
This ball has a TPU cover that we wouldn’t describe as “highly durable” for rough play. Although it handles indoor turf, it won’t handle concrete, gravel, or court-based play like you have with futsal. This ball prefers to have a natural or artificial grass surface and that is about it. If you happen to impact a tree, run the ball on concrete, or have it bounce on a gravel driveway, the outer cover does tend to get scratched up pretty rapidly. The butyl bladder is of a higher quality than other balls at this price point, allowing the ball to hold its inflation pressure with an impressive amount of consistency.
Today's soccer balls are well more advanced than in ancient times. The soccer ball of today is made of much better materials and are very durable. Among the leaders companies that manufacture soccer balls soccer balls today are Adidas, Nike, and Corpus. The top soccer balls include match balls Nike Ordem, Adidas Finale, and Brine NCAA Championship soccer ball. Don't forget to get a soccer bag for your soccer balls.
In 2010, the infamous Jabulani balls for the World Cup in South Africa transitioned from turbulent to laminar flow between 50 and 45 miles per hour, right at the speed for corner and free kicks. The transition between these different types of flow causes even more drag on the ball, which caused the Jabulani to wobble in the air and drop in ways that players weren’t expecting.

The highest in cost, top match balls for elite soccer players are constructed with a supreme quality cover, backing, and bladder for the most predictable flight pattern and striking ability. Some of the most impressive official match balls on the field are made with the threadless, seamless, beveled edge (TSBE) technology which provides a seamless surface for touch and less water uptake to stay in control. adidas soccer balls that pass a demanding series of tests, set by FIFA, on the shape, weight, performance, rebound and water absorption have the highest ranking a soccer ball can get. Most adidas training and pro match balls are FIFA approved so you can lead the charge down the pitch.

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