The downside? They’re expensive. Like, really expensive, depending on which one you get. Whether you really need one depends on your budget and how you’re going to be using your ball. For example, I use official match balls for practicing freekicks because they fly through the air really nicely. However, I don’t use them for training because if I lose my ball I’ll be set back $100-$300.
This Wilson Traditional Soccer Ball has a very traditional yet updated look, hence the name. The outside of this soccer ball is made of soft synthetic leather, making this ball feel quite smooth to the touch. The inside, also known as the bladder, of the ball is composed from Butyl rubber to provide an airtight compartment that is tough. In addition to that, Butyl rubber helps greatly with shape retention as your kid is sure to get many kicks out of this spectacular soccer ball by Wilson. Due to their reputable brand, you absolutely cannot go wrong with this traditional soccer ball by Wilson.

In 1937, the regulation soccer ball put on a little weight, increasing from 13-15 ounces to 14-16 ounces. Soccer balls used to be made exclusively of leather. Not so these days! Current technologies have come up with leather-like synthetic materials that are softer, more lightweight, water-proof, and perform as well if not better than leather soccer balls. As for the look, early soccer balls were tan but difficult to see from the stands; although white leather-washed soccer balls are known to have been used. White soccer balls replaced their tan predecessors in the 1950s, and were composed of 18 panels. Black spots were added to allow soccer players to track the ball's swerve. Today's soccer balls come in an array of colorful designs and styles to suit every player.
2010 Jabulani Adidas This ball has 8 panels. A special variant was used for the final match, the gold Jo'bulani (picture on the left), which was named after "Jo'burg", a standard South African nickname for Johannesburg, site of the final game. The ball was notable for the controversy it attracted, with players and fans contending that its aerodynamics were unusually unpredictable. [3][19]
There are a lot of options available in the market. But before buying one, you need to ask yourself, whether you are going to use it for practice, official match, indoor playing, street playing or playing on the beach. You also need to know the actual size you need. We tried to cover all these topics including the construction of a ball so that you have the idea of the different materials that are used to make it, and which material plays what type of role in the performance of your best buddy on the ground. Hope you enjoyed reading our detail reviews and soccer ball buying guide. Now it’s your turn to take the right decision.
Adidas started to make soccer balls in 1963 but made the first official FIFA World Cup ball in 1970. This is the first ball used in the World Cup to use the Buckminster type of design. Also, the first ball with 32 black and white panels. The TELSTAR was more visible on black and white televisions (1970 FIFA World Cup Mexico™ was the first to be broadcast live on television). 
Controlling the game is everything. From touch, shape, and movement, to flight of the ball, the construction of your soccer ball can impact how well you command the pitch. Competitive soccer players usually have different types of soccer balls for training, match day or just to kick around. See the options below for choosing the right adidas soccer ball for your favorite type of play.
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