In the end, the winner was fairly clear to us. Amongst all of these soccer balls, it appears that the best in this case, was the last one that we looked at Adidas MLS Top Glider Soccer Ball. When comparing all of the products side by side it just appears that in terms of design, gameplay, and durability that this one stood out amongst the rest. It has a ton of great reviews and positive customer feedback, so it appears that the vast majority of soccer players and customers were really happy with this ball.

Hope this article about cheap soccer balls was helpful and you got new information. If it was please share it with your friends & family on social profiles. You may also be interested which are 5 best cheap soccer balls size 5 and which is the best cheap soccer ball. You can also take a look at some great soccer balls from great brands like Wilson and Brine


With the increased seam length, Goff says there was actually a risk that this ball would be too rough. “Very little changes in those textures can have noticeable aerodynamic effects,” he says. The fact that the Telstar 18 has almost the same drag curve as the Brazuca, with aerodynamic properties changing at about the same speeds, is impressive. “It has to be an engineering and technical challenge,” he says.

The history of soccer balls date back to ancient times. From a couple centuries BC to about 200 AD, the Chinese used balls made from animal skins in a game called 'tsu chu', in which players had to pass them through a net stretched between two poles. The ancient Greeks, Romans, and even the Egyptians are recorded to have enjoyed a similar game that involved kicking a makeshift ball.
While using the soccer balls above, kids can learn an abundant amount of things and develop a variety of traits. The textures and vibrant designs of each soccer ball on our list can aid in visual and tactile stimulation. The materials used in each soccer ball can help to develop auditory sensory skills as each ball makes a unique sound when it is hit by a cleat.
The downside? They’re expensive. Like, really expensive, depending on which one you get. Whether you really need one depends on your budget and how you’re going to be using your ball. For example, I use official match balls for practicing freekicks because they fly through the air really nicely. However, I don’t use them for training because if I lose my ball I’ll be set back $100-$300.
In 1937, the regulation soccer ball put on a little weight, increasing from 13-15 ounces to 14-16 ounces. Soccer balls used to be made exclusively of leather. Not so these days! Current technologies have come up with leather-like synthetic materials that are softer, more lightweight, water-proof, and perform as well if not better than leather soccer balls. As for the look, early soccer balls were tan but difficult to see from the stands; although white leather-washed soccer balls are known to have been used. White soccer balls replaced their tan predecessors in the 1950s, and were composed of 18 panels. Black spots were added to allow soccer players to track the ball's swerve. Today's soccer balls come in an array of colorful designs and styles to suit every player.
As per the kids who can use this ball, it is designed for users who’re 3+ years of age. Children can play with this ball, and when it is quite soft, they can learn the art of blocking as well as heading a soccer ball without hurting themselves. Finally, it comes in 4 different colours as in addition to Blue/Black, customers can purchase it in Orange/Black, Yellow/Black, and Orange/Blue colour combination.
It depends on its intended use. Soccer ball casings are made from three kinds of synthetic materials. Polyvinyl carbonate (PVC) which is what most less expensive training balls are made from, Polyurethane (PU) which is the preferred ball for soccer tournaments, and a combination of the two. There are also foam and rubber training soccer balls for kids. Some kids' soccer balls are made of 100 percent thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), which is a kind of foamy casing material so the ball is very soft. There are greater and lesser grades of each kind of material. PU-covered balls are generally softer, livelier, and have a better feel to them, and are what most people seek when looking for a optimal performing soccer ball.
When it comes to the training soccer ball, it can be purchased at a much-reduced price as compared to the actual match-ball. Incorporating inferior quality materials in its construction, this is an ideal equipment for the sake of training. So if you’re looking for any such ball to sharpen your skills, have a look at the Adidas Champion’s League Finale Capitano Soccer Ball.
I read a few bad reviews on here but I didn't think the ball will be that bad. I had this ball for just a week! It looked great in the box but it's a very low quality soccer ball. It got deflated after hitting the post. There were marks and slits left on it after everything it hit. Might be good for kids but if you play soccer on a high level, you're really wasting your money buying this.
It is also a good idea to clean your soccer ball after you have finished using it. Although regularly cleaning a soccer ball can be a time-consuming chore, it will extend the life of the ball’s cover. The grit, dirt, and debris that the ball can pick up on any pitch impacts the panels and stitching with every rotation. So clean it thoroughly and then allow it to dry for the best possible results.
As always with Nike balls, the Merlin has an excellent feel, particularly when passing. The ball is also great for shooting due to Nike’s 4-panel construction, 360-degree sweet spot technology and the soft polyurethane outer material. It won’t deviate too much in the air due to the thermally-bonded pentagonal panel layout, so it’s perfect for training as well as games.
Our main intention of discussing the different types of balls is to educate you so that you can buy the right product. For example using practice balls on the street will bring you no good but some awful experiences as the ball will not last long. Similarly, an indoor soccer ball is not good to play on a beach. Keep this in mind when buying, and using a ball.
With it’s almost featherlike weight, this soccer ball promotes confidence amongst kids, as they will be able to kick it farther than standard size three soccer balls. As your kid uses this ball you will almost instantly begin to observe improvement in their confidence and enthusiastic towards the game of soccer. Due to the innovative design of this Rookie Gear Soccer Ball by Spalding, your will have much success as they be able to defend the goal and throw in the ball more smoothly. The cover of this soccer ball is scuff resistant, which is a tough feature to come by these days. You can rest assured knowing that you will not have to worry about annoying scuff marks that are impossible to get off of the ball.

This ball is available in several sizes that are perfect to suit a variety of ages and soccer league requirements. A size 3 ball is the common size recommended for children under the age of 8 and recommended by most junior leagues. Playing soccer can help your child develop their gross-motor skills as well as balance and coordination. Soccer is also a teamwork-heavy game that requires everyone to work together in order to win. This can encourage your child to build friendships and improves socialization skills.
Built for durability, recreation balls are made of soft synthetic materials for play on nearly any field. Typically, these balls are slightly heavier for beginner’s slower play, yet, competitors of all skill levels use these balls for practice and recreation on hard turf fields due to their resilience. Machine-stitching is the most stand-out visual difference between match balls and training balls and it offers a consistent touch for any player.
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