If you are looking to teach your little one all about the game of soccer, than this Spalding Rookie Gear soccer ball is perfect. This particular soccer ball by Spalding weighs 25 percent less than most size three soccer balls to help your child build basic essential skills. Measuring 10 inches all around, this ball is specifically designed for young recreational players who age eight or under. This soccer ball has a composite machine stitched cover to ensure your kid will get years of play out of it. Your kid has the option to choose from five different color patterns, yellow and blue, yellow with blue and orange accents, purple and blue, green and blue, or pink. No matter what color your kid may want, this soccer ball is sure to stimulate their visual sensory to keep them focused on the game.
This soccer ball will light up anywhere as it is comes with replaceable batteries which makes it better than a glow in the dark ball. Glow in the dark soccer balls cannot operate in any type of lighting as the phosphorescent materials must be in very dark lighting. The fact that the lights are impact activated is an awesome feature too, as it encourages kids to play and focus on the game.
Match balls are constructed specifically for competition and the sport's high-level training. These balls feature higher quality materials and must conform to regulation standards of your league. Training and recreational soccer balls are designed to handle extended use on a variety of playing surfaces, often featuring a PVA casing for enhanced durability.
This ball is available in several sizes that are perfect to suit a variety of ages and soccer league requirements. A size 3 ball is the common size recommended for children under the age of 8 and recommended by most junior leagues. Playing soccer can help your child develop their gross-motor skills as well as balance and coordination. Soccer is also a teamwork-heavy game that requires everyone to work together in order to win. This can encourage your child to build friendships and improves socialization skills.
On the other hand, replicas (sometimes called training balls or gliders) are designed to be just like the official match balls but are much cheaper. Their panels are often stitched rather than thermally-bonded and are made of a different material. However, they’re not necessarily less durable than official match balls. So, they’re the recommended option for most players.
Over time, many soccer balls tend to go out-of-round, especially if they are well-used. The Glider is designed to maintain its shape without losing air thanks to the firmness and consistency of the butyl bladder. Under regular use, we found that the air pressure was consistent enough that we didn’t need to add more air to the ball. If you play in organized soccer, then having consistency from the practice ball to the game ball is very important for skill development. The machine-stitched panels offer that experience for most players, even though the ball has the standard panel design.
Our main intention of discussing the different types of balls is to educate you so that you can buy the right product. For example using practice balls on the street will bring you no good but some awful experiences as the ball will not last long. Similarly, an indoor soccer ball is not good to play on a beach. Keep this in mind when buying, and using a ball.
Bouncing a few ideas around on how to improve your game? You might just start with your soccer ball. As we know, the game of soccer involves a lot of fancy footwork, technique, and team work. But what it really comes down to is how well your soccer ball performs for you. Whether you're coaching, playing, or have a child in a soccer league, knowing a little more about the soccer ball, such as how to select one, how to tell a good soccer ball from a cheap one, and how to take care of it, can help you get the most out of yours. And that just might be all you need to kick your season off on the right foot this year.
2010 Jabulani Adidas This ball has 8 panels. A special variant was used for the final match, the gold Jo'bulani (picture on the left), which was named after "Jo'burg", a standard South African nickname for Johannesburg, site of the final game. The ball was notable for the controversy it attracted, with players and fans contending that its aerodynamics were unusually unpredictable. [3][19]

If you have a youth player for whom you are purchasing this soccer ball, then take note that the Size 3 ball in this series is closer to a Size 4 ball. The weight and feel is still accurate, so it is good for home practice and play. The sizing just might make it difficult to take this ball to practice for some players. It doesn’t come with a 32-panel design, but it does have the traditional hexagon panels over the entire cover of the ball. This allows players to work on some ball movement skills, as well as placement drills, with relative ease at home.
I read a few bad reviews on here but I didn't think the ball will be that bad. I had this ball for just a week! It looked great in the box but it's a very low quality soccer ball. It got deflated after hitting the post. There were marks and slits left on it after everything it hit. Might be good for kids but if you play soccer on a high level, you're really wasting your money buying this.
While this ball is absolutely adorable and feels like it's a good quality, I'm disappointed with the one I received. It has little chips in the design—there are a few little white marks in the sections that are orange. Also, there is some sort of sticky stuff on the ball, almost like residue from an old sticker. I can probably remove it with Goo-Gone... I'm just not thrilled that it seems to be used or at least bought and returned. While I'm sure my nephew will love it for his 1st birthday party tomorrow, I'm mildly embarrassed to give it to my brother and his wife because of the appearance. If the party weren't tomorrow, I'd return / exchange it. Frustrating!

With the increased seam length, Goff says there was actually a risk that this ball would be too rough. “Very little changes in those textures can have noticeable aerodynamic effects,” he says. The fact that the Telstar 18 has almost the same drag curve as the Brazuca, with aerodynamic properties changing at about the same speeds, is impressive. “It has to be an engineering and technical challenge,” he says.
The Futsal ball is typically smaller, harder, and heavier, allowing for less bounce and better control on harder surfaces. Senda Athletics is the official ball partner of U.S. Youth Futsal and the Vitoria is the Official Ball of the USYF League. Accented with bright red or green and created with fair trade practices, its stamp of "Respect," "Joy," and "Community" expresses the company's philosophy.

It depends on its intended use. Soccer ball casings are made from three kinds of synthetic materials. Polyvinyl carbonate (PVC) which is what most less expensive training balls are made from, Polyurethane (PU) which is the preferred ball for soccer tournaments, and a combination of the two. There are also foam and rubber training soccer balls for kids. Some kids' soccer balls are made of 100 percent thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), which is a kind of foamy casing material so the ball is very soft. There are greater and lesser grades of each kind of material. PU-covered balls are generally softer, livelier, and have a better feel to them, and are what most people seek when looking for a optimal performing soccer ball.


These soccer balls are exact replicas of the finale game balls, right on down to the specific design details that can be found on the ball. If you’re looking for a durable, reliable ball that can help players replicated the feeling of playing the game at home, then the Top Training Series by Adidas is one of the best options to consider today. Each ball is guaranteed to pass FIFA tests for weight, circumference, rebound, and water absorption. It is the closest you can get in the entry-level categories for a soccer ball to the match ball experience. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3OKagE2ZIRA
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