Soccer is also one of the most simplistic games that you can play. A field, a couple of nets, and rulebook can be highly beneficial and desirable, especially for team play. Really all you need, however, is a ball and enough open space to kick it. The modern soccer ball was created more recently in 1855 by a man named Charles Goodyear who created the very first vulcanized rubber balls. Today there are many types and styles of soccer balls available on the market to suit a variety of skill levels and needs.
Crafted by Adidas, the Telstar 18 is the official ball of the FIFA World Cup. Drawing inspiration from the company's first World Cup match ball, which debuted at the 1970 tournament in Mexico, the new ball reimagines the 12 black panels on an otherwise white design. Fun fact: the iconic original black and white ball was made that way to be more visible for black-and-white TV viewers, and it was dubbed the "star of television."
Coming from a reputable brand in the field of Sporting Goods, the Adidas Euro 16 Glider Soccer Ball can be purchased in no less than nine stylish designs. Moreover, it is available in three different sizes. When the size three soccer ball is designed for players under age 8, the size 4 comes handy for all of those lying between 8 – 12 years of age. And coming towards the correct size, the size five should be purchased by footballers who’re older than 12.
The history of soccer balls date back to ancient times. From a couple centuries BC to about 200 AD, the Chinese used balls made from animal skins in a game called 'tsu chu', in which players had to pass them through a net stretched between two poles. The ancient Greeks, Romans, and even the Egyptians are recorded to have enjoyed a similar game that involved kicking a makeshift ball.
We all should keep in mind that the construction of a standard soccer ball is different than a street soccer ball. When you are playing on street or hard surface, you need a rough and tough ball. The shape needs to be spherical, and the cover/panels should be made out of rubber. They need to be scratch resistant as well. Not only that, if the panels are not hand-stitched with the high-quality seam there is a big chance they will not last long.
On the other hand, replicas (sometimes called training balls or gliders) are designed to be just like the official match balls but are much cheaper. Their panels are often stitched rather than thermally-bonded and are made of a different material. However, they’re not necessarily less durable than official match balls. So, they’re the recommended option for most players. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2Xn84L3Kcs
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