The downside? They’re expensive. Like, really expensive, depending on which one you get. Whether you really need one depends on your budget and how you’re going to be using your ball. For example, I use official match balls for practicing freekicks because they fly through the air really nicely. However, I don’t use them for training because if I lose my ball I’ll be set back $100-$300.

I read a few bad reviews on here but I didn't think the ball will be that bad. I had this ball for just a week! It looked great in the box but it's a very low quality soccer ball. It got deflated after hitting the post. There were marks and slits left on it after everything it hit. Might be good for kids but if you play soccer on a high level, you're really wasting your money buying this.
When it is about quality, these are almost same as premium match soccer balls but obviously not the same. To be exact, you can say official match soccer balls are positioning between premium match balls and training soccer balls regarding quality. That means these balls also offer an excellent level of air retention, shape, water absorption, curve, and performance. Although usually, they are not as durable as training balls but as a whole, they are very much durable.
On the other hand, replicas (sometimes called training balls or gliders) are designed to be just like the official match balls but are much cheaper. Their panels are often stitched rather than thermally-bonded and are made of a different material. However, they’re not necessarily less durable than official match balls. So, they’re the recommended option for most players.
In 1937, the regulation soccer ball put on a little weight, increasing from 13-15 ounces to 14-16 ounces. Soccer balls used to be made exclusively of leather. Not so these days! Current technologies have come up with leather-like synthetic materials that are softer, more lightweight, water-proof, and perform as well if not better than leather soccer balls. As for the look, early soccer balls were tan but difficult to see from the stands; although white leather-washed soccer balls are known to have been used. White soccer balls replaced their tan predecessors in the 1950s, and were composed of 18 panels. Black spots were added to allow soccer players to track the ball's swerve. Today's soccer balls come in an array of colorful designs and styles to suit every player.
Well, panels are not any different component. Panels are the segments or octagon quilt that are seen outside the balls. Of course, nowadays you will find some other shapes besides octagon. FIFA official balls usually contain 32 panels. But nowadays you will also find 26, 18, 14, 8 or even 6 panels with different shapes and designs from those of conventional balls.
The Adidas Starlancer Performance soccer ball is great for beginners and experienced players. The inside of the ball is a nylon-wound carcass that is highly durable. The outside of the ball is composed of a special TPU material and is designed to withstand hard impacts. The ball arrives deflated, but once it is inflated the butyl bladder keeps the air secured inside. The bladder also gives the ball it’s round shape. The ball is available in a bright pink and blue design as well as a bright green and black design.
My friend and I were kicking a soccer ball around the front yard. It was maybe 2007 and I was getting ready to leave for a couple weeks on a trial. Trying to be cute, I tried a handling skill where I flipped the ball up behind my back and then kick it with my heel so it comes back over my head again. So I kicked the ball too hard, it goes out into the street, and a truck promptly runs it over.
Cool Soccer Balls Pink Soccer Gear Team Sports Collections Save on adidas X Glider or Starlancer V Soccer Balls Pink Soccer Balls Green Soccer Balls Training adidas Soccer Balls Best adidas Soccer Balls adidas Soccer Balls Select Training Soccer Balls Training Soccer Balls Youth Soccer Balls Best Soccer Balls Select Soccer Balls Soccer Athletic Sports Balls
“Had I seen the drag curve for Jabulani prior to the 2010 World Cup in South Africa I would have been calling FIFA and Adidas saying please don’t use this ball,” Goff says. The fact that the Jabulani became unpredictable and beach-ball-like during these long passes really helped Spain win in 2010, Goff says. The Spanish team relied almost entirely on short precise passes, without long kicks that became unstable with the Jabulani ball. “That was the perfect example of a team that really fit the style of play for that ball,” Goff says.

Changes in temperature will also affect the inflation level of the soccer ball. Extreme heat or extreme cold will alter the shape of the bladder and this will affect the integrity of the soccer ball. Although it doesn’t seem like you could reach an extreme temperature that could do this to a soccer ball, just leaving a ball in your trunk or the back of a van on a hot Summer’s day will do it.
Everything becomes scaled down for smaller soccer players compared to the adult game. Kids play on small fields nowhere near the size of a full regulation field 100 or more yards long, with as few as three players compared to 11 for grownups. Even in a league, parents may serve as referees, games may last only 20 minutes and scores more than likely won't be kept. In keeping with this small world, kids' soccer balls are also smaller.
For those taking their game to the next level, it’s important to train with a ball similar to what is used for your matches. Your passing, shooting and general foot skills will be different for lighter soccer balls made with a premium bladder like latex. Try out an NFHS approved ball which is used for some club, high school, and college teams. To be NFHS approved, the soccer ball needs to:
×