The downside? They’re expensive. Like, really expensive, depending on which one you get. Whether you really need one depends on your budget and how you’re going to be using your ball. For example, I use official match balls for practicing freekicks because they fly through the air really nicely. However, I don’t use them for training because if I lose my ball I’ll be set back $100-$300.

A: Butyl bladders are an excellent choice for the interior of soccer balls because they create an airtight seal in the inner compartment. This helps greatly with air retention. Even better, you will not have to keep inflating soccer balls that contain a butyl bladder for the fact that they hold air much longer than soccer balls that don’t have a bladder made from butyl rubber.
With the exception of the Wilson Traditional soccer ball, each of the soccer balls above is unique. Not only by the bold colors and detailed designs but the machine stitching technology that has sewn the panels together. Kids can benefit greatly from having a soccer ball that stands out because it will encourage them to learn more about soccer so that they can really use their cool, unique soccer ball. A unique ball will also distinguish their ball from many others at soccer practices and camps.
If you have gone through this article that we have prepared for you to choose the best soccer ball, then we are confident that, you are now able to take an educated, and wise decision to buy the top soccer ball according to your requirement. During the process of our reviews and making this buying guide, we tried to pick the best soccer balls for the money.
You should also try to keep the ball at the correct pressure. Do not over or under pressurize a soccer ball. Use the manufactures recommended air pressure that is printed on most balls. Most soccer balls have a pressure rating of 6 to 8 lbs. or 0.6 or 0.8 BAR. It is recommended that you use a pressure gauge to measure the exact amount of pressure in a ball after inflating and before use. It can also be a good idea to deflate the soccer training ball after use to reduce the pressure on the seams and stitching. Reflate the ball to the appropriate pressure before using it for a game or training.
In 2010, the infamous Jabulani balls for the World Cup in South Africa transitioned from turbulent to laminar flow between 50 and 45 miles per hour, right at the speed for corner and free kicks. The transition between these different types of flow causes even more drag on the ball, which caused the Jabulani to wobble in the air and drop in ways that players weren’t expecting.
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We have gathered a list of soccer balls that all fall within the mini to youth categories from across the web. These balls are the perfect size for your little one, whether they are just learning how to kick or about to start their first year on their middle school soccer team. We hope that one of our Top 10 Best Soccer Balls for Kids will be the right size…and style for your child.
Now you know that there are total 5 variations in ball size. Buy the appropriate size as per your requirement. Some buyers who don’t know these differences, make a mistake while buying. For example, if someone is looking for an official match ball, but they purchase a size 3 ball by mistake or because of lack of knowledge. If you also do this, surely you are not going to be satisfied with the purchase.
For those taking their game to the next level, it’s important to train with a ball similar to what is used for your matches. Your passing, shooting and general foot skills will be different for lighter soccer balls made with a premium bladder like latex. Try out an NFHS approved ball which is used for some club, high school, and college teams. To be NFHS approved, the soccer ball needs to:
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