Soccer, also known as "the beautiful game," is an excellent sport to increase physical fitness and the concept of teamwork. Get your little superstar started with one of our top 10 soccer balls varying in sizes and age ranges. Our list was recently updated to include new products as well as updated product specifications like construction materials, size, cost and availability.
This Mikasa Serious Soccer Ball is ready to for action anytime and anywhere with its soft synthetic leather covering as it. It’s panels encases colorful triangle like designs. This durably built soccer ball comes with four color options to choose from, black and white, green and white, purple and white, and red and white. The stitched synthetic cover aids greatly with keeping the ball intact during and after rough play.
With so many of them currently available in the market, it isn’t easy to find the best soccer ball without prior research. When soccer has evolved significantly in the past few decades, the soccer ball has changed with it. From featuring stitches and patches in the past to using multi-panels construction nowadays, the ball of today is much quicker, agile and swing friendly as compared to its former counterparts.
We sell other soccer gear and equipment as well, including several outdoor and indoor portable soccer goals and indoor soccer equipment for those hardcore players. And what better way to carry around your ball and pair of adidas F50 shoes than with one of our soccer bags. Browse our full line of soccer gear from the best brand names in the game. Don’t forget to sign up for our free Garage Club to save big on the year’s best gear.
If you are looking to teach your little one all about the game of soccer, than this Spalding Rookie Gear soccer ball is perfect. This particular soccer ball by Spalding weighs 25 percent less than most size three soccer balls to help your child build basic essential skills. Measuring 10 inches all around, this ball is specifically designed for young recreational players who age eight or under. This soccer ball has a composite machine stitched cover to ensure your kid will get years of play out of it. Your kid has the option to choose from five different color patterns, yellow and blue, yellow with blue and orange accents, purple and blue, green and blue, or pink. No matter what color your kid may want, this soccer ball is sure to stimulate their visual sensory to keep them focused on the game.
My friend and I were kicking a soccer ball around the front yard. It was maybe 2007 and I was getting ready to leave for a couple weeks on a trial. Trying to be cute, I tried a handling skill where I flipped the ball up behind my back and then kick it with my heel so it comes back over my head again. So I kicked the ball too hard, it goes out into the street, and a truck promptly runs it over.
For the most part, soccer balls are pretty affordable. Training soccer balls for kids start at under $10, and for around $60 or less, you can get a good, league-approved tournament soccer ball. Of course there are more expensive ones, depending on what you're looking for. Cost depends on the type of ball, materials, quality, and also the outlet you buy from. Our soccer balls can be bought economically in sets of six or more, or singly. Shopping online at Epic Sports can save you up to 60 percent if not more off retail prices on your favorite brands.
Premium Match Balls. These are the most expensive soccer balls that you’ll find on the market today. They are FIFA-approved balls, so they meet all of the standards necessary for international play. Air retention, water-resistance, and performance are far superior when compared to a training ball. Virtually every professional league uses a ball of this quality for game play.

You should also try to keep the ball at the correct pressure. Do not over or under pressurize a soccer ball. Use the manufactures recommended air pressure that is printed on most balls. Most soccer balls have a pressure rating of 6 to 8 lbs. or 0.6 or 0.8 BAR. It is recommended that you use a pressure gauge to measure the exact amount of pressure in a ball after inflating and before use. It can also be a good idea to deflate the soccer training ball after use to reduce the pressure on the seams and stitching. Reflate the ball to the appropriate pressure before using it for a game or training.
On the other hand, replicas (sometimes called training balls or gliders) are designed to be just like the official match balls but are much cheaper. Their panels are often stitched rather than thermally-bonded and are made of a different material. However, they’re not necessarily less durable than official match balls. So, they’re the recommended option for most players. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2Xn84L3Kcs
×