The soccer is the world's most popular and widely watched game. Due to increasing technological advancement and demand for performance, the ball manufacturers have been developing new designs progressively. A traditional spherical football made of 32 leather panels stitched together in 1970s has become only 14 synthetic curved panels thermally bonded without stitches ball in 2006 and more recently 8 panels football in 2010. Despite being most popular game in the world, scan data is available on aerodynamic properties of footballs especially Jabulani, Teamgeist and Fevernova balls. The primary objectives of this study were to evaluate aerodynamic performances of these three soccer balls. The aerodynamic forces and moments were measured experimentally for a range of wind speeds. The aerodynamic forces and their non-dimensional coefficients were determined and compared.

What sets each soccer ball apart from another is the quality of the materials that are used in its construction. The lining, bladder, cover, and the quality of the overall craftsmanship will all influence the final cost of the soccer ball you’re looking at. Higher quality balls are usually bonded together to provide a superior shape retention experience and offer a truer flight.
Similar to our Traditional Soccer Ball by Wilson, our Performance EPP Glider Soccer Ball by Adidas is composed of a rubber Butyl bladder to ensure it stays inflated longer with a machine stitched exterior. This solar pink/lucky pink soccer ball is sure to be a hit with young girls as it has beautiful purple accents. Your young girl can start practicing soccer drills right away as this ball comes inflated with the perfect amount of air. Giving credit to the incredible stitching and this soccer ball retains air perfectly, even when used on asphalt surfaces. This high quality soccer ball by Adidas is a wonderful option for beginners, and kids in general.
When any object goes through the air, a thin cushion of air wraps around it that stays relatively still. This boundary layer is why you get dust trapped on your ceiling fan. At slower speeds, the air around a soccer ball moves smoothly over the surface and separates off the sides of the ball at its widest points. Imagine a ball moving from right to left across a clock, Goff explains, so traveling from the 3 to the 9. With laminar flow, the air flows over the surface and then flows off at the 12 and 6, which creates more drag in the air. Drag slows the ball down faster. At higher speeds, the air moves turbulently across the ball’s surface and peels off at the 2 and 4. The wind effectively wraps around the back. This turbulent flow has less drag, which means the ball keeps moving at high speed for longer.
On the other hand, replicas (sometimes called training balls or gliders) are designed to be just like the official match balls but are much cheaper. Their panels are often stitched rather than thermally-bonded and are made of a different material. However, they’re not necessarily less durable than official match balls. So, they’re the recommended option for most players. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2Xn84L3Kcs
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