“Had I seen the drag curve for Jabulani prior to the 2010 World Cup in South Africa I would have been calling FIFA and Adidas saying please don’t use this ball,” Goff says. The fact that the Jabulani became unpredictable and beach-ball-like during these long passes really helped Spain win in 2010, Goff says. The Spanish team relied almost entirely on short precise passes, without long kicks that became unstable with the Jabulani ball. “That was the perfect example of a team that really fit the style of play for that ball,” Goff says.
The type of soccer cleats or indoor shoes needed depends on what kind of field your child’s team will be practicing and play on. Have your child try on Firm Ground cleats with hard rubber or plastic studs if playing on a pitch made of natural grass or on well-worn artificial turf. Look for Artificial Turf shoes with a super low profile and an outsole evenly covered all-over in small rubber studs for the best traction on an indoor or newer outdoor turf surface.

The most modern feature is an embedded NFC chip, which is found on the top of the ball. If you download a free app on iOS or Android, you can personally interact with the ball's exclusive content and location-specific challenges. You'll also be able to participate and enter competitions and World Cup-related challenges. Of course, you can record and upload your experiences for social media posterity.
New! 2018 FIFA® World Cup Russia Telstar Mechta Ball: Get your own official knockout stage ball, designed with a new red color to represent the host country. While the Telstar Mechta features an intensified look, it has the same high-quality construction as the Telstar 18 ball used in the group phase. Mechta means “dream” or “ambition” in Russian, honoring both players’ and fans’ FIFA World Cup ambitions.

Premium Match Balls. These are the most expensive soccer balls that you’ll find on the market today. They are FIFA-approved balls, so they meet all of the standards necessary for international play. Air retention, water-resistance, and performance are far superior when compared to a training ball. Virtually every professional league uses a ball of this quality for game play.

Over time, many soccer balls tend to go out-of-round, especially if they are well-used. The Glider is designed to maintain its shape without losing air thanks to the firmness and consistency of the butyl bladder. Under regular use, we found that the air pressure was consistent enough that we didn’t need to add more air to the ball. If you play in organized soccer, then having consistency from the practice ball to the game ball is very important for skill development. The machine-stitched panels offer that experience for most players, even though the ball has the standard panel design.


Over time, many soccer balls tend to go out-of-round, especially if they are well-used. The Glider is designed to maintain its shape without losing air thanks to the firmness and consistency of the butyl bladder. Under regular use, we found that the air pressure was consistent enough that we didn’t need to add more air to the ball. If you play in organized soccer, then having consistency from the practice ball to the game ball is very important for skill development. The machine-stitched panels offer that experience for most players, even though the ball has the standard panel design.


This makes such a cute gift for a toddler or baby! I love the fox design. I bought this for my 1 year old for Christmas and he loves it. It comes deflated and comes with a small air pump and it’s super easy to inflate. I also like that it’s made of a sturdy material if a baby or toddler bites into it, they aren’t going to get a chunk out of it (like they might with foam toys). It doesn’t bounce, but it’s fun to kick around and won’t hurt too much if kids are throwing it around and it happens to hit someone on accident. (I would know because my 3 year old loves to throw it at his little brother, lol.)
To be honest, this ball’s a bit like a classic car, in that it’s awesome – when it works. The Jabulani is prone to valve issues, although they can be fixed. If you need something durable, we wouldn’t recommend this ball. However, if you’re looking to add an awesome ball to your collection – and you’ve got the cash – consider grabbing a Jabulani before they go extinct.
On the other hand, replicas (sometimes called training balls or gliders) are designed to be just like the official match balls but are much cheaper. Their panels are often stitched rather than thermally-bonded and are made of a different material. However, they’re not necessarily less durable than official match balls. So, they’re the recommended option for most players.
“I kind of feel sympathy for the players and especially the goalkeepers that have to get used to a new ball,” Goff says. So far the Telstar 18 has received criticism from a few goalkeepers that played with it starting in November, unhappy with how it moves in the air and the way the surface feels. Goalkeepers, unlike every other player on the pitch, have to predict where the ball will go in order to block it, while also not having the freedom to run around the field to adjust as the ball flies. That means goalies often have the most complaints about a new design. “Every time there’s a World Cup and a new ball the goalkeepers complain, because they’ve been given a new ball,” says Goff.
This soccer ball offers the traditional look and design of the pentagon panels in alternating black and white, allowing players to learn foot placement for a good bend. There is enough weight to the ball to allow for accurate crossing and passing drills, while enough rebound exists for dribbling and shooting drills. If you take your game seriously and you want to improve at home, this is one of the best and most affordable options that you’ll want to consider. Multiple sizes are available with this traditional design.
With the exception of the Wilson Traditional soccer ball, each of the soccer balls above is unique. Not only by the bold colors and detailed designs but the machine stitching technology that has sewn the panels together. Kids can benefit greatly from having a soccer ball that stands out because it will encourage them to learn more about soccer so that they can really use their cool, unique soccer ball. A unique ball will also distinguish their ball from many others at soccer practices and camps.
In 1937, the regulation soccer ball put on a little weight, increasing from 13-15 ounces to 14-16 ounces. Soccer balls used to be made exclusively of leather. Not so these days! Current technologies have come up with leather-like synthetic materials that are softer, more lightweight, water-proof, and perform as well if not better than leather soccer balls. As for the look, early soccer balls were tan but difficult to see from the stands; although white leather-washed soccer balls are known to have been used. White soccer balls replaced their tan predecessors in the 1950s, and were composed of 18 panels. Black spots were added to allow soccer players to track the ball's swerve. Today's soccer balls come in an array of colorful designs and styles to suit every player.
Changes in temperature will also affect the inflation level of the soccer ball. Extreme heat or extreme cold will alter the shape of the bladder and this will affect the integrity of the soccer ball. Although it doesn’t seem like you could reach an extreme temperature that could do this to a soccer ball, just leaving a ball in your trunk or the back of a van on a hot Summer’s day will do it.
Soccer — or football as it's known around the world — is arguably the most loved sport on Earth. Although Americans still aren't as enamored of the sport as the rest of the world is, teams around the country are stealing hearts and minds, and Americans are getting into the game. For years, soccer has been a sport played by kids, college students, and ex-pats, but it's now being cheered in stadiums and watched on national TV. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DGp37du0xbQ
×