The Adidas Glider is machine stitched with a durable TPU exterior. Such an outer layer makes it a durable product as this ball stands tall against scratches as well as abrasion. It also has a butyl bladder which makes sure that once you pump the air into it, it stays there for an extended duration. So regardless of the rough usage, this ball will stay inflated for years to come.
I have about 30 soccer balls- price listed is per ball. I have more than the 12 pictured- some doubles of the champions league balls, two of the unwrapped Brine ball, 5 or so futsal balls. Some are worth more than 25, some less. Just make me a good off and tell me which ball you want! Keep in mind when you offer that I am paying most of the shipping already. Balls will ship deflated. I will reconfirm that all hold air and make sure they are cleaned off before shipping. There is only one ball in the lot that has a gouge/ panel issue. All aside are in good playable shape.
The new ball is a product of four years of design and testing, and looks are about the only thing it shares with its older relative. The original model was comprised of 32 individual panels that had to be hand-stitched together. The new one, manufactured in China and Pakistan, has just six panels that are machine-stitched around a newly designed latex bladder, ensuring a more stable performance from ball to ball.
This Wilson Traditional Soccer Ball has a classic black and white design that kids are familiar with. For that fact, kids will have no problem becoming acquainted with this fun soccer ball with it’s non-distracting design. This is a very tough soccer ball with machine sewn stitching to ensure that the panels stay in place and the stitching will not fray as your kid kicks it up and down the soccer field or in the backyard. This Wilson Soccer Ball is so tough that even your family pet and kid may play together without the ball getting ruined. With it’s synthetic leather exterior, this Traditional Soccer Ball by Wilson is not only eco friendly, but easy to clean, too. The soft synthetic leather makes it very easy to write your kid's name onto the ball so that it will not get mixed up with the other kids they may play with in view of the fact that soccer balls promote social play.
“I kind of feel sympathy for the players and especially the goalkeepers that have to get used to a new ball,” Goff says. So far the Telstar 18 has received criticism from a few goalkeepers that played with it starting in November, unhappy with how it moves in the air and the way the surface feels. Goalkeepers, unlike every other player on the pitch, have to predict where the ball will go in order to block it, while also not having the freedom to run around the field to adjust as the ball flies. That means goalies often have the most complaints about a new design. “Every time there’s a World Cup and a new ball the goalkeepers complain, because they’ve been given a new ball,” says Goff.
Every four years there’s a new ball for the World Cup—and every four years players are unhappy with it. Maybe it’s too light and has too much lift, like the 2002 Fevernova. Or maybe it wobbles unexpectedly in the air, making it harder for goalies to predict its motion, like the 2006 Teamgist. Or maybe the ball suddenly changes speed, dropping out of the air and causing accidental handballs, like the 2010 Jabulani.

We found that the feeling of this ball was a bit harder than other soccer balls at this price point. This doesn’t affect the performance of the ball, as the movements were accurate and authentic when struck. The weight does tend to affect the foot and ankle over time, causing a bit of soreness after continuous play. It also features a machine-stitched construction that is accompanied by an internal nylon-wound carcass so the ball has an improved level of durability compared to other soccer balls at this price point.


The downside? They’re expensive. Like, really expensive, depending on which one you get. Whether you really need one depends on your budget and how you’re going to be using your ball. For example, I use official match balls for practicing freekicks because they fly through the air really nicely. However, I don’t use them for training because if I lose my ball I’ll be set back $100-$300.
A Futsal ball is basically an indoor soccer ball used for playing 'Futsal', a term literally meaning 'indoor football'. Futsal is a kind of soccer played on a basketball-sized court using a smaller, heavier, less bouncy ball, and demands many of the same skills as outdoor soccer. Size-wise, FIFA-approved futsal balls are just shy of 25 inches in circumference, slightly smaller than a Size 4 soccer ball. The ball is created with less bounce to facilitate indoor play.
The downside? They’re expensive. Like, really expensive, depending on which one you get. Whether you really need one depends on your budget and how you’re going to be using your ball. For example, I use official match balls for practicing freekicks because they fly through the air really nicely. However, I don’t use them for training because if I lose my ball I’ll be set back $100-$300.
The highest in cost, top match balls for elite soccer players are constructed with a supreme quality cover, backing, and bladder for the most predictable flight pattern and striking ability. Some of the most impressive official match balls on the field are made with the threadless, seamless, beveled edge (TSBE) technology which provides a seamless surface for touch and less water uptake to stay in control. adidas soccer balls that pass a demanding series of tests, set by FIFA, on the shape, weight, performance, rebound and water absorption have the highest ranking a soccer ball can get. Most adidas training and pro match balls are FIFA approved so you can lead the charge down the pitch.
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