Having just the right soccer ball can make it easy to sharpen your skills each time you step on the soccer pitch. Official-sized Nike soccer balls provide a realistic feel and bounce as you move down the pitch, or choose colorful Brava soccer balls to show off support for your country's World Cup team. Pick up adidas soccer balls that highlight your love for your favorite football club, so that everyone will know if you support Man U or Chelsea.
You'll be happy to know that our 20-60% discounts today on soccer balls and name brand soccer gear and clothing can really add up to large savings for Epic Sports customers. Whether your team is shopping for soccer balls, soccer jerseys, goals, nets, shoes, socks, cleats, uniforms, training DVDs, unique gifts, and much more, our team beats the competition. And so will yours when you save a lot of money on the right styles and the right equipment. Whether you're a serious team player in the US or internationally you'll always receive big scores on just about everything you need right here in our shop.

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This is a felt cover ball, which is the major characteristics of an indoor soccer ball. Durable felt cover offers the softness and helps to control the rebounding characteristics. This is a size 5 ball with hand stitched panels. Hand stitched panels are more durable than machine stitched panels. The bounce is not too high, which should be the case of a standard indoor soccer ball.
In 2010, the infamous Jabulani balls for the World Cup in South Africa transitioned from turbulent to laminar flow between 50 and 45 miles per hour, right at the speed for corner and free kicks. The transition between these different types of flow causes even more drag on the ball, which caused the Jabulani to wobble in the air and drop in ways that players weren’t expecting.
Using a wind tunnel, Goff has researched the flight properties of the Telstar 18, drawing its drag curve to discover where the ball might dip and swerve in the air, similar to the knuckleball free kicks favored by Cristiano Ronaldo “Even if aerodynamically the Telstar 18 isn’t that different from the Brazuca, it’s still going to wobble a little bit differently because the panel shapes are different,” Goff says.
2010 Jabulani Adidas This ball has 8 panels. A special variant was used for the final match, the gold Jo'bulani (picture on the left), which was named after "Jo'burg", a standard South African nickname for Johannesburg, site of the final game. The ball was notable for the controversy it attracted, with players and fans contending that its aerodynamics were unusually unpredictable. [3][19]
If you've ever noticed, a traditional soccer ball resembles a geodesic dome building. Such as the one designed by architect, Richard Buckminster Fuller. Thus the ball became called the Buckminster Ball. Or more simply, the "Buckeyball". The design is characterized by a pattern of twenty hexagon pieces, and twelve pentagon pieces, fitted together to create a perfect sphere. The soccer ball has undergone many design changes of various-shaped panels stitched together. But until the geodesic dome-like ball, it was never quite round enough to perform right. Manufacturers settled upon the modern thirty-two panel design, which enables the ball to roll and spin more evenly and smoothly. Which is probably why it's the most popular competition soccer ball on the market today. The Buckminister-style soccer ball was first sold in the 1950s, and debuted in the 1970 World Cup tournament.
Crafted by Adidas, the Telstar 18 is the official ball of the FIFA World Cup. Drawing inspiration from the company's first World Cup match ball, which debuted at the 1970 tournament in Mexico, the new ball reimagines the 12 black panels on an otherwise white design. Fun fact: the iconic original black and white ball was made that way to be more visible for black-and-white TV viewers, and it was dubbed the "star of television."
Another type of soccer ball that some players may find to be useful is the indoor soccer ball. Indoor balls are designed to have less bounce and rebound to them, making it possible to control the ball on a tighter court or field. The cover of an indoor ball is also the strongest of any category, so it can withstand play on turn, hard court surfaces, and impacts with walls.
Despite the similarities with the Brazuca, the few differences between this ball and what players have gotten used to over the last four years will have an impact on play, says Firoz Alam, an aerodynamics engineer at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Australia, who has also performed wind tunnel tests on the Telstar 18. “When the player is making a short pass, they have to push a little harder, because at less then 60 kilometers per hour [or 37 miles per hour]it has more flight resistance than the Brazuca,” says Alam. The mid-range passes and corner kicks that gave the Jabulani so much trouble have been resolved. Compared to the Brazuca, the Telstar 18 is also more aerodynamically efficient in the 40-50 mile an hour range, so Alam says players will actually have to kick a little softer or they’re likely to overshoot. Over 55 miles an hour the two balls will feel very similar.
This can be used as a great option for goalkeeper training as well. Why? Look, you can hardly see the lines on this ball, hence you won’t be able to guess the direction by only seeing the spin of the ball. That means as a goalkeeper you will have to give full concentration to detect the direction of the sliding balls. This is obviously helpful if you are a goalkeeper, and looking for a sliding challenge.
What sets each soccer ball apart from another is the quality of the materials that are used in its construction. The lining, bladder, cover, and the quality of the overall craftsmanship will all influence the final cost of the soccer ball you’re looking at. Higher quality balls are usually bonded together to provide a superior shape retention experience and offer a truer flight.
Many of today's soccer balls forgo the classic 32-panel design for 8-panel or 14-panel designs that exude a sleek, hyper-modern look (i.e., the2006 FIFA World Cup Teamgeist adidas soccer ball). Whether you prefer a traditional or contemporary style soccer ball, you'll find it here in the SoccerGarage.com Balls section. We carry professional level FIFA approved match soccer balls, futsal balls, training soccer balls and a variety of special surface and indoor soccer balls.

With so many of them currently available in the market, it isn’t easy to find the best soccer ball without prior research. When soccer has evolved significantly in the past few decades, the soccer ball has changed with it. From featuring stitches and patches in the past to using multi-panels construction nowadays, the ball of today is much quicker, agile and swing friendly as compared to its former counterparts.

Our main intention of finding the official match balls was to help you find a solution which is good in quality, and you can use it for league plays. The process was tough we must say. Not all the replica balls have good quality. That is why we were very choosy in the process. We filtered the balls not only based on our experience but also based on the experience of other users.

On the other hand, replicas (sometimes called training balls or gliders) are designed to be just like the official match balls but are much cheaper. Their panels are often stitched rather than thermally-bonded and are made of a different material. However, they’re not necessarily less durable than official match balls. So, they’re the recommended option for most players. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2Xn84L3Kcs
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