With the increased seam length, Goff says there was actually a risk that this ball would be too rough. “Very little changes in those textures can have noticeable aerodynamic effects,” he says. The fact that the Telstar 18 has almost the same drag curve as the Brazuca, with aerodynamic properties changing at about the same speeds, is impressive. “It has to be an engineering and technical challenge,” he says.
Despite the similarities with the Brazuca, the few differences between this ball and what players have gotten used to over the last four years will have an impact on play, says Firoz Alam, an aerodynamics engineer at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Australia, who has also performed wind tunnel tests on the Telstar 18. “When the player is making a short pass, they have to push a little harder, because at less then 60 kilometers per hour [or 37 miles per hour]it has more flight resistance than the Brazuca,” says Alam. The mid-range passes and corner kicks that gave the Jabulani so much trouble have been resolved. Compared to the Brazuca, the Telstar 18 is also more aerodynamically efficient in the 40-50 mile an hour range, so Alam says players will actually have to kick a little softer or they’re likely to overshoot. Over 55 miles an hour the two balls will feel very similar.
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This year, the ball shouldn’t have that kind of impact on which team wins the World Cup. In wind tunnel tests, Goff found that Telstar 18 has a very similar aerodynamic profile to the 2014 Brazuca ball, which flew without the wobbles of the Jabulani. The Jabulani was the first ball to have six seams and despite having a roughened surface, it was too smooth, says Goff. When the Brazuca was released, it had 68 percent more seams than the Jabulani to help change the airflow around the ball. The Telstar 18 is even more improved. Instead of transitioning to laminar flow in the middle of free kicks, Goff found that the Telstar 18 goes through its drag crisis at a lower speed of 38 miles an hour.
The Futsal ball is typically smaller, harder, and heavier, allowing for less bounce and better control on harder surfaces. Senda Athletics is the official ball partner of U.S. Youth Futsal and the Vitoria is the Official Ball of the USYF League. Accented with bright red or green and created with fair trade practices, its stamp of "Respect," "Joy," and "Community" expresses the company's philosophy.

What is the best soccer ball and where to find it? If you’re looking for the answer to these questions, we’ve got you all covered. We’ve prepared this guide, after thorough research, for all those football fanatics who want to purchase the best possible equipment when it comes to playing soccer. Because it doesn’t matter whether you’re an amateur footballer or even a professional athlete, playing with the best soccer ball can make all the difference.


Everything becomes scaled down for smaller soccer players compared to the adult game. Kids play on small fields nowhere near the size of a full regulation field 100 or more yards long, with as few as three players compared to 11 for grownups. Even in a league, parents may serve as referees, games may last only 20 minutes and scores more than likely won't be kept. In keeping with this small world, kids' soccer balls are also smaller.
Adidas designs every World Cup ball, and on top of being a big seller for them, engineers at the company are constantly a little closer to the perfect ball, Goff says. The ideal soccer ball is a pimple-covered, perfect sphere, its surface just subtly textured enough to keep the airflow around the ball slightly turbulent. Unintuitive as this might sound, the ridges and pimples on the ball make it more aerodynamic, helping the ball to fly through the air more stably.
Well, panels are not any different component. Panels are the segments or octagon quilt that are seen outside the balls. Of course, nowadays you will find some other shapes besides octagon. FIFA official balls usually contain 32 panels. But nowadays you will also find 26, 18, 14, 8 or even 6 panels with different shapes and designs from those of conventional balls.

The soccer is the world's most popular and widely watched game. Due to increasing technological advancement and demand for performance, the ball manufacturers have been developing new designs progressively. A traditional spherical football made of 32 leather panels stitched together in 1970s has become only 14 synthetic curved panels thermally bonded without stitches ball in 2006 and more recently 8 panels football in 2010. Despite being most popular game in the world, scan data is available on aerodynamic properties of footballs especially Jabulani, Teamgeist and Fevernova balls. The primary objectives of this study were to evaluate aerodynamic performances of these three soccer balls. The aerodynamic forces and moments were measured experimentally for a range of wind speeds. The aerodynamic forces and their non-dimensional coefficients were determined and compared.

Adidas started to make soccer balls in 1963 but made the first official FIFA World Cup ball in 1970. This is the first ball used in the World Cup to use the Buckminster type of design. Also, the first ball with 32 black and white panels. The TELSTAR was more visible on black and white televisions (1970 FIFA World Cup Mexico™ was the first to be broadcast live on television). 
We all should keep in mind that the construction of a standard soccer ball is different than a street soccer ball. When you are playing on street or hard surface, you need a rough and tough ball. The shape needs to be spherical, and the cover/panels should be made out of rubber. They need to be scratch resistant as well. Not only that, if the panels are not hand-stitched with the high-quality seam there is a big chance they will not last long.
Great replica soccer balls! My kids love them. So much so, they are waiting until the fall when their new season starts to "keep them nice." They are authentic Adidas, and even come with the FIFA reflective sticker to place once the ball is inflated. Side note: The balls do arrive flat, so make sure you have a good pump with separate gauge as not to over inflate.
In terms of durability, you can’t really go past Select. The polyurethane cover on the Numero 10 is tough enough to withstand dog bites and general wear and tear, but still feels nice and soft when kicked. Although this ball is a bit more expensive than other replicas, it comes with a two-year warranty for peace of mind when buying. It also retains its bounce very well over the years – perfect for practicing volleys and clearances.
To be honest, this ball’s a bit like a classic car, in that it’s awesome – when it works. The Jabulani is prone to valve issues, although they can be fixed. If you need something durable, we wouldn’t recommend this ball. However, if you’re looking to add an awesome ball to your collection – and you’ve got the cash – consider grabbing a Jabulani before they go extinct.
This soccer ball offers the traditional look and design of the pentagon panels in alternating black and white, allowing players to learn foot placement for a good bend. There is enough weight to the ball to allow for accurate crossing and passing drills, while enough rebound exists for dribbling and shooting drills. If you take your game seriously and you want to improve at home, this is one of the best and most affordable options that you’ll want to consider. Multiple sizes are available with this traditional design.

If you are looking to teach your little one all about the game of soccer, than this Spalding Rookie Gear soccer ball is perfect. This particular soccer ball by Spalding weighs 25 percent less than most size three soccer balls to help your child build basic essential skills. Measuring 10 inches all around, this ball is specifically designed for young recreational players who age eight or under. This soccer ball has a composite machine stitched cover to ensure your kid will get years of play out of it. Your kid has the option to choose from five different color patterns, yellow and blue, yellow with blue and orange accents, purple and blue, green and blue, or pink. No matter what color your kid may want, this soccer ball is sure to stimulate their visual sensory to keep them focused on the game.
Kids' everyday life are full of imaginations and adventures. From playing mommy to top restaurant chef, their role playing abilities are limitless. Why stop there? With this one of the kind animal soccer balls, designed to be fun and safe for kids as young as 18 months all the way up to 5 years old. Now, their imaginations could roam the safari, amazon forest, or even the coldest north pole. These mini soccer balls are tested rigorously to pass all BPA, phthalates, lead, and heavy metals requirements to ensure a 100% fun time with zero worry. Measured 5.75" in diameter and made extra soft, they are just the right size for toddler and young kids to have fun without straining and hurting their feet.
Having just the right soccer ball can make it easy to sharpen your skills each time you step on the soccer pitch. Official-sized Nike soccer balls provide a realistic feel and bounce as you move down the pitch, or choose colorful Brava soccer balls to show off support for your country's World Cup team. Pick up adidas soccer balls that highlight your love for your favorite football club, so that everyone will know if you support Man U or Chelsea.
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