Weighing 14 to 16 oz., a No. 5 ball is the largest-sized ball, and players 12 and older can feel like grownups upon graduating to this size, also used by adults. Its circumference is 27 to 28 inches. Prices can start at $15 for a cheap training ball and up to $150 for a match quality ball, especially if it is a special edition issued in conjunction with the World Cup or Olympics.
As per the kids who can use this ball, it is designed for users who’re 3+ years of age. Children can play with this ball, and when it is quite soft, they can learn the art of blocking as well as heading a soccer ball without hurting themselves. Finally, it comes in 4 different colours as in addition to Blue/Black, customers can purchase it in Orange/Black, Yellow/Black, and Orange/Blue colour combination.
One size does not fit all kids for shin protection. The right size shin-guard is critical to comfort and protection for your mini. Most kids shin-guards have padding in an attached ankle guard for extra protection. When first starting out, look for a single strap system with a front closure to keep ankle and shin-guards in place to eliminate constant adjusting on the field.

With the increased seam length, Goff says there was actually a risk that this ball would be too rough. “Very little changes in those textures can have noticeable aerodynamic effects,” he says. The fact that the Telstar 18 has almost the same drag curve as the Brazuca, with aerodynamic properties changing at about the same speeds, is impressive. “It has to be an engineering and technical challenge,” he says.
In 1937, the regulation soccer ball put on a little weight, increasing from 13-15 ounces to 14-16 ounces. Soccer balls used to be made exclusively of leather. Not so these days! Current technologies have come up with leather-like synthetic materials that are softer, more lightweight, water-proof, and perform as well if not better than leather soccer balls. As for the look, early soccer balls were tan but difficult to see from the stands; although white leather-washed soccer balls are known to have been used. White soccer balls replaced their tan predecessors in the 1950s, and were composed of 18 panels. Black spots were added to allow soccer players to track the ball's swerve. Today's soccer balls come in an array of colorful designs and styles to suit every player.
Comfort during the shot should be the number one factor to watch out when you are buying a beach soccer ball. Senda Playa offers you that comfort from its larger, and softer panels. So, you will find it very easy to shot the ball barefooted. The panels are scratch-resistant too that makes it suitable for playing on the rough sand beach. No doubt, like any other beach ball, this one also offers water-resistant cover too.

Each of these soccer balls on our list is designed specifically for kids. Developmental appropriateness in toys is very important because if a kid cannot understand how to use a toy or the toys is the wrong size for them, they will not benefit from it. These soccer balls are colorful enough to keep your kid’s attention without distracting them from the game. Additionally, these soccer balls for kids are all great for both well-seasoned players and beginners.
In the end, the winner was fairly clear to us. Amongst all of these soccer balls, it appears that the best in this case, was the last one that we looked at Adidas MLS Top Glider Soccer Ball. When comparing all of the products side by side it just appears that in terms of design, gameplay, and durability that this one stood out amongst the rest. It has a ton of great reviews and positive customer feedback, so it appears that the vast majority of soccer players and customers were really happy with this ball.
One of the top brands recommended by coaches, Adidas has a large line of fantastically designed soccer balls available in just the right size for your little one. The Ace Glider II is the perfect way to give your child a soccer ball that not only lasts but also shines on the field! The unique colorings of this ball make it visible from a long distance away, giving you a great way to spot your little one against others on the field. Not just a pretty face, the Glider II is also a sturdy and well-constructed soccer ball that utilizes top-quality materials for long-lasting play. The cover is made of durable TPU material that has been built to withstand daily practice and can handle both indoor and outdoor play. Unlike similar balls that tend to develop blisters over time, this ball uses heavy machine stitching that can significantly extend the life of the ball.
Adidas says its design was motivated by Russia's urban landscapes. It uses textured graphics and a metallic sheen to bring a modern look to the classic design. The ball is made of six panels of thermally bonded TPU and about 15% silicone. The materials allow for better trajectory, accuracy, responsiveness, and low water absorption. It also feels well-padded and slightly lighter than previous match balls.
Grab a soccer ball for matches, training or to support your kids favorite team. adidas carries official NHS approved soccer balls that are perfect for your club or high school teams. Look for technology like threadless, seamless, beveled edge (TSBE) soccer balls that provide a seamless surface for touch. Get ready to take your skills to the next level.
At the World Cup level, these tiny changes in a ball’s aerodynamics can legitimately impact a team’s performance, so the intense scrutiny of the World Cup ball is perhaps to be expected. “You could argue that it’s the most important piece of equipment in the most popular sport in the world,” says John Eric Goff, Professor of Physics at University of Lynchburg.
We found that the feeling of this ball was a bit harder than other soccer balls at this price point. This doesn’t affect the performance of the ball, as the movements were accurate and authentic when struck. The weight does tend to affect the foot and ankle over time, causing a bit of soreness after continuous play. It also features a machine-stitched construction that is accompanied by an internal nylon-wound carcass so the ball has an improved level of durability compared to other soccer balls at this price point.
In 1937, the regulation soccer ball put on a little weight, increasing from 13-15 ounces to 14-16 ounces. Soccer balls used to be made exclusively of leather. Not so these days! Current technologies have come up with leather-like synthetic materials that are softer, more lightweight, water-proof, and perform as well if not better than leather soccer balls. As for the look, early soccer balls were tan but difficult to see from the stands; although white leather-washed soccer balls are known to have been used. White soccer balls replaced their tan predecessors in the 1950s, and were composed of 18 panels. Black spots were added to allow soccer players to track the ball's swerve. Today's soccer balls come in an array of colorful designs and styles to suit every player.
Built for durability, recreation balls are made of soft synthetic materials for play on nearly any field. Typically, these balls are slightly heavier for beginner’s slower play, yet, competitors of all skill levels use these balls for practice and recreation on hard turf fields due to their resilience. Machine-stitching is the most stand-out visual difference between match balls and training balls and it offers a consistent touch for any player.
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