When a tournament is held (like the FIFA World Cup), the sponsor of the event will design a brand new ball. These are official match balls – they’re used by professionals during real matches. They are designed to the highest possible build quality, have textured surfaces to improve stability in flight, and feature thermally-bonded panels for durability.
Despite the similarities with the Brazuca, the few differences between this ball and what players have gotten used to over the last four years will have an impact on play, says Firoz Alam, an aerodynamics engineer at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Australia, who has also performed wind tunnel tests on the Telstar 18. “When the player is making a short pass, they have to push a little harder, because at less then 60 kilometers per hour [or 37 miles per hour]it has more flight resistance than the Brazuca,” says Alam. The mid-range passes and corner kicks that gave the Jabulani so much trouble have been resolved. Compared to the Brazuca, the Telstar 18 is also more aerodynamically efficient in the 40-50 mile an hour range, so Alam says players will actually have to kick a little softer or they’re likely to overshoot. Over 55 miles an hour the two balls will feel very similar.
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We all should keep in mind that the construction of a standard soccer ball is different than a street soccer ball. When you are playing on street or hard surface, you need a rough and tough ball. The shape needs to be spherical, and the cover/panels should be made out of rubber. They need to be scratch resistant as well. Not only that, if the panels are not hand-stitched with the high-quality seam there is a big chance they will not last long.
Crafted by Adidas, the Telstar 18 is the official ball of the FIFA World Cup. Drawing inspiration from the company's first World Cup match ball, which debuted at the 1970 tournament in Mexico, the new ball reimagines the 12 black panels on an otherwise white design. Fun fact: the iconic original black and white ball was made that way to be more visible for black-and-white TV viewers, and it was dubbed the "star of television."
This soccer ball by American Challenge comes in three different vibrant colors, lemon yellow, lime green and orange. This is a great soccer ball for your young kid as the outer covering is made from high grade thermoplastic polyurethane. Even more sustainable, the backing material is made up of two layers of poly and cotton lining. The inside of this American Challenge Soccer Ball, also known as the bladder, is composed of Hybrid SR and retains air for up to two to four weeks. This is amazing, as your young kid is sure to play with this colorful ball often.
Although the length of kick may end up being a little shorter, the changes make the Telstar 18 more balanced, says Alam. On other balls, Alam and his team have found that there is a difference in how the ball flies based on where it’s kicked in relation to the seams. His tests have found that the Telstar 18 ball doesn’t have as much variation. The total length of seam of the Telstar 18 is 14.1 feet, 3.28 feet more than on the Brazuca. With the longer seam, and more symmetric panels, no matter how the ball is turned there is the same amount of seam exposed. “The other two balls were not like that, they were significantly different,” he says.

The history of soccer balls date back to ancient times. From a couple centuries BC to about 200 AD, the Chinese used balls made from animal skins in a game called 'tsu chu', in which players had to pass them through a net stretched between two poles. The ancient Greeks, Romans, and even the Egyptians are recorded to have enjoyed a similar game that involved kicking a makeshift ball.
Whatever ball you decide to purchase try to prolong the life of the ball by taking care of it. Don’t let your players stand on the ball or try to change the shape. Don’t leave them outside between practice sessions as prolonged exposure to sun or rain will damage the surface of the ball and dramatically reduce its life. Always try to keep balls clean after play by wiping them down with a damp cloth.

I personally like more to buy online because I have a bigger choice and I can analyze, watch and compare more things at once. I have more time and I’m relaxed. When you are buying online you can take a look for a discount on coupon sites. Another good way is to subscribe to the store’s email list, so they contact loyal customers when there are any sales or if they have a coupon for you.
This ball is a size 5 which makes it great for small children to play with. Batteries for the lights are included. While they do have a long lifespan, they are easy to replace when the time comes. The LED’s shut off after a minute of inactivity, which helps make the batteries last longer. Your child’s knowledge of cause and effect will increase as they realize the ball lights up after being hit or kicked.
All in all a street soccer ball needs to be rough and tough with all the attributes we discussed so far. Senda street soccer ball has fulfilled all these requirements, and met our expectation. We recommend you to buy this option if you want to play on street or hard surface. We found this as a good quality model with the proper construction as we discussed. The weight and bounce are also according to the requirement of a street soccer ball.

Select's attention to detail can be found in the ball's handy work and composition. It comes in nine different colors, including bright orange and bright yellow, which are perfect for training in semi-darkness. The 1.5mm PU cover is hand-stitched and textured for the brighter colors, adding durability. The design also aides turf play by zeroing in on control and resistance.

The downside? They’re expensive. Like, really expensive, depending on which one you get. Whether you really need one depends on your budget and how you’re going to be using your ball. For example, I use official match balls for practicing freekicks because they fly through the air really nicely. However, I don’t use them for training because if I lose my ball I’ll be set back $100-$300.
Controlling the game is everything. From touch, shape, and movement, to flight of the ball, the construction of your soccer ball can impact how well you command the pitch. Competitive soccer players usually have different types of soccer balls for training, match day or just to kick around. See the options below for choosing the right adidas soccer ball for your favorite type of play.
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