Our main intention of discussing the different types of balls is to educate you so that you can buy the right product. For example using practice balls on the street will bring you no good but some awful experiences as the ball will not last long. Similarly, an indoor soccer ball is not good to play on a beach. Keep this in mind when buying, and using a ball.
Every four years there’s a new ball for the World Cup—and every four years players are unhappy with it. Maybe it’s too light and has too much lift, like the 2002 Fevernova. Or maybe it wobbles unexpectedly in the air, making it harder for goalies to predict its motion, like the 2006 Teamgist. Or maybe the ball suddenly changes speed, dropping out of the air and causing accidental handballs, like the 2010 Jabulani.

Grab a soccer ball for matches, training or to support your kids favorite team. adidas carries official NHS approved soccer balls that are perfect for your club or high school teams. Look for technology like threadless, seamless, beveled edge (TSBE) soccer balls that provide a seamless surface for touch. Get ready to take your skills to the next level.


Whatever ball you decide to purchase try to prolong the life of the ball by taking care of it. Don’t let your players stand on the ball or try to change the shape. Don’t leave them outside between practice sessions as prolonged exposure to sun or rain will damage the surface of the ball and dramatically reduce its life. Always try to keep balls clean after play by wiping them down with a damp cloth.


This Wilson Traditional Soccer Ball has a very traditional yet updated look, hence the name. The outside of this soccer ball is made of soft synthetic leather, making this ball feel quite smooth to the touch. The inside, also known as the bladder, of the ball is composed from Butyl rubber to provide an airtight compartment that is tough. In addition to that, Butyl rubber helps greatly with shape retention as your kid is sure to get many kicks out of this spectacular soccer ball by Wilson. Due to their reputable brand, you absolutely cannot go wrong with this traditional soccer ball by Wilson.

In 2010, the infamous Jabulani balls for the World Cup in South Africa transitioned from turbulent to laminar flow between 50 and 45 miles per hour, right at the speed for corner and free kicks. The transition between these different types of flow causes even more drag on the ball, which caused the Jabulani to wobble in the air and drop in ways that players weren’t expecting.
This makes such a cute gift for a toddler or baby! I love the fox design. I bought this for my 1 year old for Christmas and he loves it. It comes deflated and comes with a small air pump and it’s super easy to inflate. I also like that it’s made of a sturdy material if a baby or toddler bites into it, they aren’t going to get a chunk out of it (like they might with foam toys). It doesn’t bounce, but it’s fun to kick around and won’t hurt too much if kids are throwing it around and it happens to hit someone on accident. (I would know because my 3 year old loves to throw it at his little brother, lol.)
This makes such a cute gift for a toddler or baby! I love the fox design. I bought this for my 1 year old for Christmas and he loves it. It comes deflated and comes with a small air pump and it’s super easy to inflate. I also like that it’s made of a sturdy material if a baby or toddler bites into it, they aren’t going to get a chunk out of it (like they might with foam toys). It doesn’t bounce, but it’s fun to kick around and won’t hurt too much if kids are throwing it around and it happens to hit someone on accident. (I would know because my 3 year old loves to throw it at his little brother, lol.)
With the increased seam length, Goff says there was actually a risk that this ball would be too rough. “Very little changes in those textures can have noticeable aerodynamic effects,” he says. The fact that the Telstar 18 has almost the same drag curve as the Brazuca, with aerodynamic properties changing at about the same speeds, is impressive. “It has to be an engineering and technical challenge,” he says.
In 2010, the infamous Jabulani balls for the World Cup in South Africa transitioned from turbulent to laminar flow between 50 and 45 miles per hour, right at the speed for corner and free kicks. The transition between these different types of flow causes even more drag on the ball, which caused the Jabulani to wobble in the air and drop in ways that players weren’t expecting.
“I kind of feel sympathy for the players and especially the goalkeepers that have to get used to a new ball,” Goff says. So far the Telstar 18 has received criticism from a few goalkeepers that played with it starting in November, unhappy with how it moves in the air and the way the surface feels. Goalkeepers, unlike every other player on the pitch, have to predict where the ball will go in order to block it, while also not having the freedom to run around the field to adjust as the ball flies. That means goalies often have the most complaints about a new design. “Every time there’s a World Cup and a new ball the goalkeepers complain, because they’ve been given a new ball,” says Goff.
However, in Goff’s wind tests, he and his team noticed that the Telstar 18 had a little more resistance at high speeds, and predict that the ball will go about eight to nine percent less distance down the pitch on long kicks. This means that Manuel Neuer, the goalkeeper for Germany who was considered to be the x-factor that brought Germany the win in 2014, might not have quite as much of an impact clearing balls from the goal this time around Goff says. “You’d see him just kicking the ball way, way down the pitch, and [this World Cup] you might notice that some of those kicks aren’t quite as long as before,” Goff says.
Soccer is also one of the most simplistic games that you can play. A field, a couple of nets, and rulebook can be highly beneficial and desirable, especially for team play. Really all you need, however, is a ball and enough open space to kick it. The modern soccer ball was created more recently in 1855 by a man named Charles Goodyear who created the very first vulcanized rubber balls. Today there are many types and styles of soccer balls available on the market to suit a variety of skill levels and needs.
Some of the best moments are made with a soccer ball. Whether it’s an official World Cup, Copa America or Champions League ball, we have licensed competition balls to ignite your gameday play … and the training balls that will get you there. Find performance-crafted soccer balls at Hibbett Sports in just the right size, from size 3 for the youngest players to size 5 for the most experienced. Shop indoor play with 6-panel balls, or 18- to 32-panel outdoor panel balls with ultimate control and playability. We have the right ball for natural or artificial turf. Select from match, premium match or training balls. Is Futsal your game? We have those too. Hibbett Sports’ high-volume purchasing power means in-stock access to the brands you trust like adidas, Nike, Select and more. Shop soccer balls in the store or online at Hibbett Sports.
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