From the players at the World Cup to the best clubs in the world battling it our for the Champions League title, the little round thing at the center of the field is an Adidas soccer ball. The 2014 World Cup Brazuca soccer ball became an instant winner, with the unique panel design that helps the ball fly straight, far, and accurate. The UEFA Champions League match ball features a star panel design, helping the stars on the field play at the top level. These soccer balls are considered some of the best in the world. When looking for a lower price on a match ball, the Adidas Competition soccer ball uses a traditional panel design to deliver the best touch and play. The Adidas Top Training soccer balls are perfected to help retain air and shape while taking a pounding during a touch training session. The Adidas Top Replique and Replique soccer balls perform well as a trainer or quick game. The Adidas UCL Capitano is a great ball to always have on hand for a game with friends.
This miniaturized soccer ball may seem very tiny, measuring just under 6 inches in diameter. While definitely not a legal size for any type of league play, this small ball is ideal for toddlers to start building their basic skills. Utilizing this ball, your child can practice kicking, grabbing, throwing, and grasping which can assist in the development of gross-motor skills. Playing with your child is also a great way to strengthen familial bonds and bolster your little one’s self-confidence.
This makes such a cute gift for a toddler or baby! I love the fox design. I bought this for my 1 year old for Christmas and he loves it. It comes deflated and comes with a small air pump and it’s super easy to inflate. I also like that it’s made of a sturdy material if a baby or toddler bites into it, they aren’t going to get a chunk out of it (like they might with foam toys). It doesn’t bounce, but it’s fun to kick around and won’t hurt too much if kids are throwing it around and it happens to hit someone on accident. (I would know because my 3 year old loves to throw it at his little brother, lol.)
This was one of the few soccer balls that came our way that didn’t come inflated out of the box. How well the ball is inflated will depend on the long-term viability of the butyl bladder in this ball. When properly inflated with the correct needle, the air can be held for weeks, or even months, at a time. Compared to latex bladders, which need to be inflated about once per week on average, this Nike soccer ball offers a minimal maintenance experience. As a practice and play ball, the Nike Pitch Premier League Soccer Ball offers players a number of options that can help them improve their skills.
If you're headed to the park to play a quick pickup game, brightly colored adidas soccer balls can help make it easy to distinguish your match from other games that might be being played nearby. Dribbling skills conducted with mini Nike soccer balls can hone your control skills, so you can glide past defenders with ease. Look for 12-panel soccer balls that provide a true, accurate flight with each strike, and rubber butyl bladders that offer excellent shape and air retention, so you can quickly jump into a game without looking for a pump. If you prefer playing indoors, check out a futsal ball that's slightly smaller than regulation soccer balls and is designed for use on hard indoor courts.
This soccer ball by American Challenge comes in three different vibrant colors, lemon yellow, lime green and orange. This is a great soccer ball for your young kid as the outer covering is made from high grade thermoplastic polyurethane. Even more sustainable, the backing material is made up of two layers of poly and cotton lining. The inside of this American Challenge Soccer Ball, also known as the bladder, is composed of Hybrid SR and retains air for up to two to four weeks. This is amazing, as your young kid is sure to play with this colorful ball often.
In 2010, the infamous Jabulani balls for the World Cup in South Africa transitioned from turbulent to laminar flow between 50 and 45 miles per hour, right at the speed for corner and free kicks. The transition between these different types of flow causes even more drag on the ball, which caused the Jabulani to wobble in the air and drop in ways that players weren’t expecting.
On the other hand, replicas (sometimes called training balls or gliders) are designed to be just like the official match balls but are much cheaper. Their panels are often stitched rather than thermally-bonded and are made of a different material. However, they’re not necessarily less durable than official match balls. So, they’re the recommended option for most players. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2Xn84L3Kcs
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